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Three turtles resting closely together on a log, one end of which is submerged in brackish water
Turtle Vocalizations Reframe Origins of Auditory Communication
Sounds made by more than 50 vertebrates previously thought to be mute push back the origin of this type of communication by at least 100 million years, a study finds.
Turtle Vocalizations Reframe Origins of Auditory Communication
Turtle Vocalizations Reframe Origins of Auditory Communication

Sounds made by more than 50 vertebrates previously thought to be mute push back the origin of this type of communication by at least 100 million years, a study finds.

Sounds made by more than 50 vertebrates previously thought to be mute push back the origin of this type of communication by at least 100 million years, a study finds.

vocalization
Woman and baby chimpanzee face to face, as if they were talking to each other
Could a Less Complex Larynx Have Enabled Speech in Humans?
Alejandra Manjarrez, PhD | Aug 11, 2022 | 4 min read
A paper argues that the evolutionary loss of a thin vocal membrane in the larynx may have facilitated oral communication.  
Photo of fish in the Haemulidae family
Fish Are Chattier Than Previously Thought
Connor Lynch | May 2, 2022 | 5 min read
Once thought to be silent, fish turn out to produce a range of vocalizations—so polluting the oceans with noise could pose a danger to them.
a male musk duck
Talking Duck Stuns Animal Behavior Researcher
Christie Wilcox, PhD | Sep 5, 2021 | 7 min read
Leiden University’s Carel ten Cate tracked down 34-year-old duck recordings—and the man who made them—to verify that musk ducks are capable of vocal learning, an ability that hadn’t been thought to exist in waterfowl.
Screams Communicate Human Emotions
Phil Jaekl | Jul 1, 2021 | 5 min read
A group of self-styled screamologists are sifting through the noisiness of nonverbal human vocalizations and finding previously undemonstrated forms of communication.
mole-rat, naked mole-rat, animal behavior, social behavior, dialect, language, eusocial, evolution,
Naked Mole Rat Colonies Have Their Own Unique Dialects
Amanda Heidt | Feb 4, 2021 | 6 min read
Chirp dialects appear to be enforced by the colony’s queen, but scientists aren’t sure how. 
The Sound and the Fear
The Scientist Staff | Oct 1, 2020 | 1 min read
See University of California, Los Angeles, animal behavior researcher Dan Blumstein explain common characteristics of vocalizations that express fearful emotions.
seal talking vocalization singing Star Wars twinkle little star teach human sound song melody melodies
Image of the Day: Vocal Tracks
Chia-Yi Hou | Jun 25, 2019 | 1 min read
Hear seals imitating human sounds and melodies.
deer forest sounds
Browsing Deer Affect How A Forest Sounds
Jef Akst | Jun 1, 2019 | 3 min read
Changes in the auditory environment as a result of herbivory could influence how animals communicate, and may have implications for sound-based monitoring of species.
Image of the Day: Watch and Learn
Carolyn Wilke | Feb 25, 2019 | 1 min read
Young zebra finches that receive feedback after they sing from a video of a fluffed-up female eventually develop more accurate tunes.
Recording of “Sonic Attack” in Cuba Was Crickets: Scientists
Kerry Grens | Jan 7, 2019 | 2 min read
Biologists say a sound suspected to have caused headaches, nausea, and possible brain damage among diplomats is actually of insects chirping.
Why Human Speech Is Special
Philip Lieberman | Jul 1, 2018 | 10+ min read
Evolutionary changes in both the vocal tract and the brain were necessary for humans’ remarkable gift of gab.
Primer: Acoustics and Physiology of Human Speech
Philip Lieberman | Jun 30, 2018 | 2 min read
People have a unique anatomy that supports our ability to produce complex language.
Image of the Day: Whistling Caterpillar
The Scientist Staff and The Scientist Staff | Mar 1, 2018 | 1 min read
Nessus sphinx hawkmoth larvae make alarm calls using mechanics similar to rocket engines. 
What Bat Quarrels Tell Us About Vocal Learning
Katarina Zimmer | Jan 1, 2018 | 4 min read
New research shows humans aren’t that different from our winged cousins.
Sound of the Day: Big Mouth Gulf Corvina
The Scientist Staff and The Scientist Staff | Dec 20, 2017 | 1 min read
Researchers document the loudest sound ever recorded in fish.
Biologists Will Be Listening to the Eclipse
Kerry Grens | Aug 18, 2017 | 2 min read
At 100 sites around North America, field recorders are set to record natures’ response to the blotting out of the sun on Monday.
Song Around the Animal Kingdom
The Scientist Staff | Mar 1, 2017 | 3 min read
Diverse species are said to sing, but music is in the ear of the beholder.
Birds May Make Music, But They Lack Rhythm
Jenny Rood | Mar 1, 2017 | 3 min read
Birdsong bears a striking resemblance to human music, but it’s not yet clear that birds interpret it that way.
Bats Sing Sort of Like Birds
Bob Grant | Mar 1, 2017 | 3 min read
Some bat vocalizations resemble bird songs, though at higher frequencies, and as researchers unveil the behaviors’ neural underpinnings, the similarities may run even deeper.
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