Alejandra Manjarrez

Alejandra Manjarrez

Alejandra Manjarrez is a freelance science journalist who contributes to The Scientist. She has a PhD in systems biology from ETH Zurich and a master’s in molecular biology from Utrecht University. After years studying bacteria in a lab, she now spends most of her days reading, writing, and hunting science stories, either while traveling or visiting random libraries around the world. Her work has also appeared in Hakai, The Atlantic, and Lab Times.

Articles by Alejandra Manjarrez
Unexpected Brain Strategy Links Two Events Separated by Time
Unexpected Brain Strategy Links Two Events Separated by Time
Alejandra Manjarrez | May 13, 2020
A new study in mice does not find evidence supporting two popular ideas for the mechanism for bridging the temporal time gap between two paired stimuli.
Skulls from the Yucatán Peninsula a Clue to Early American Settlers
Skulls from the Yucatán Peninsula a Clue to Early American Settlers
Alejandra Manjarrez | Apr 7, 2020
The crania of individuals who lived in the Yucatán Peninsula during the late Pleistocene show a high degree of anatomical diversity among them, and their skull shapes differ from that of other North American populations of the time.
Fetal Gene Therapy Helps Mice with Spinal Muscular Atrophy
Fetal Gene Therapy Helps Mice with Spinal Muscular Atrophy
Alejandra Manjarrez | Dec 11, 2019
The animals lived longer and showed milder symptoms than untreated mice, although they didn’t survive as long as wildtype mice.
Sleep Study in Antarctica Explores Role of Cultural Differences
Sleep Study in Antarctica Explores Role of Cultural Differences
Alejandra Manjarrez | Dec 1, 2019
Habits such as napping might influence how humans cope with extreme environments, such as those at a polar research facility in winter.
Microfluidic Chambers Trigger Sleep in <em>C. elegans</em>
Microfluidic Chambers Trigger Sleep in C. elegans
Alejandra Manjarrez | Nov 19, 2019
This newly described behavior occurs spontaneously, but can be modulated by food availability, temperature, and the size of the chambers.
Caution Urged for Comparing Ancient and Modern Humans&rsquo; Oral Microbes
Caution Urged for Comparing Ancient and Modern Humans’ Oral Microbes
Alejandra Manjarrez | Aug 7, 2019
Microbial species that are commonly associated with oral diseases in modern humans are unreliable proxies for determining tooth health status in ancient samples, a new study finds.