News

Agriculture Research Funding May Wither Under Republican 'Contract With America'
Agriculture Research Funding May Wither Under Republican 'Contract With America'
Land-grant college officials fear their institutions may be among hardest hit if proposed policy is enacted Agricultural scientists and research administrators, already beset by budget cuts and the effects of political turmoil in the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), warn of a much more formidable threat to their support looming on the horizon. Particularly affected, according to these observers, would be land-grant colleges. The "Contract with America," if enacted by the new, R
Religious Scientists Sense The Divine In Their Work
Religious Scientists Sense The Divine In Their Work
Many detect a new openness to finding a synergy between the realms of laboratory research and theology From the days of Galileo, the public perception that scientific tenets are antithetical to religious doctrine has been a strong one. Yet many researchers who hold strong religious beliefs maintain that science and religion are not incompatible. The view that most scientists are atheists, while perhaps closer to urban legend than demonstrable fact, remains a popular one. A Wall Street Journ
Scientific Collaboration Flourishes As Mongolia Throws Open Its Borders To Western Scientists
Scientific Collaboration Flourishes As Mongolia Throws Open Its Borders To Western Scientists
Among the growing number of collaborations being established between researchers from the United States and those of former communist countries, investigators from a variety of disciplines are calling a burgeoning relationship with one nation the scientific opportunity of a lifetime. They are referring to Mongolia, a country that until two years ago was virtually untrodden by Western scientists. After its peaceful, democratic "revolution" of 1992, Mongolia opened its borders and its economy to
Starting Up: What's Attractive To Biotech Investors?
Starting Up: What's Attractive To Biotech Investors?
Industry observers maintain that capital is available for companies that have the right formula for success With almost-daily headlines chronicling funding and scientific setbacks to the biotechnology industry, the challenges for scientist- entrepreneurs contemplating making a go of their idea seem daunting, even insurmountable. Yet biotech analysts, officials, researchers, and other observers insist that, despite the depressed financial climate in the industry and investor wariness, capital
Research Initiative Aims To Bring The Digital Library Closer To Reality
Research Initiative Aims To Bring The Digital Library Closer To Reality
The digital library--an eagerly anticipated but as yet ill- defined and largely unrealized concept--took an important step toward actualization this past fall with the launching of a new collaborative federal research effort, according to government officials, project investigators, and librarians. Institution: Carnegie Mellon University Funding: $4.8 million Research Focus: Digital video library incorporating math and science materials Major Partners: Bell Atlantic Network Services Digital

Notebook

Notebook
Notebook
Table of Contents An Improbable Debut Strange Bedfellows SRO Silvery Science Those Cards And Letters Keep Coming The Annals of Improbable Research (AIR)--a new journal published by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Museum and developed by the same brilliant, but twisted, minds who originated the Ig Nobel Prizes for dubious scientific achievements--issued its first volume on December 14. The debut was commemorated at a ceremony highlighted by (questionable) pomp (Marilyn Vos Savant,

Leaders of Science

Frances K. Conley
Frances K. Conley
FRANCES K. CONLEY Professor of neurosurgery,Stanford University School of Medicine, California, and Chief of the section of neurosurgery, Palo Alto VA Medical Center, California "THE SCIENTIST serves the scientific community by providing an easy method for tracking who's doing what in research. It is an amazing tool." Frances Conley holds the distinction of being the first female, tenured full professor of neurosurgery in the United States. A fellow of the American College of Surgeons, she is

Opinion

Science And Christianity Are Compatible--With Some Compromises
Science And Christianity Are Compatible--With Some Compromises
According to a respected 1991 poll on religion by the Graduate School of the City University of New York, more than 86 percent of Americans profess to be Christian, and only 7.5 percent claimed "no religion" (A.L. Goldman, New York Times, April 10, 1991, page A1). The percentage of believers is higher in the United States than in any other developed country. Whether the percentage of scientists who are also believers is equally high is undetermined; I know of no reliable polls dealing with the

Letter

Misconduct Meeting
Misconduct Meeting
This letter provides specific information concerning the way the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) conceived its meeting ("convocation") on scientific misconduct, 7 June 1994 (Franklin Hoke, "Meeting On Science Conduct Seen As A Noble Attempt That Fell Short," The Scientist, 25 July 1994, page 1). I tried to make this meeting more relevant by proposing that specific documentation concerning specific examples be distributed at this meeting. I was following a recommendation made in the report b

Commentary

In Due Diligence Searches For Prior Art,The Patent Office Simply Does Not Compute
In Due Diligence Searches For Prior Art,The Patent Office Simply Does Not Compute
 Yogi Berra's classic line, "It's deja vu all over again," came to mind as I read a story on the United States Patent Office fiasco regarding the Compton's New Media case (S. Chartrand, "At the Patent Office, a digital dawn," New York Times, Nov. 12, 1994, page 39). To recap: In August 1993 the Patent Office awarded Compton's, a San Diego-based CD-ROM publisher, exclusive rights on a basic search and retrieval software feature in its interactive CD-ROM products. This would have allowed C

Research

Health-Care Research: Who Has The Healthiest Publication Record?
Health-Care Research: Who Has The Healthiest Publication Record?
different things to different people. To the biomedical scientist it could include the crucial basic investigations that lead to a life- and cost-saving vaccine. By contrast, to a hospital's staff ethicist it could entail devising a policy of informed consent for experimental medical treatments. Health-care research, according to many experts, covers the spectrum from fundamental research projects like those in cell biology to such applied questions as how to lower costs yet maintain high-qua

Hot Paper

Immunology
Immunology
C.S. Hsieh, S.E. Macatonia, C.S. Tripp, S.F. Wolf, A. Ogarra, K.M. Murphy, "Development of TH1 CD4+ T cells through IL-12 produced by Listeria-induced macrophages," Science, 260:547-9, 1993. (Cited in 170 publications through December 1994) Comments by Kenneth M. Murphy This paper describes a mechanism of T-cell development during an immune response; specifically, it deals with the role of the cytokine interleukin 12 (IL-12) in determining which form of the T-helper (TH) population will domina
Environmental Chemistry
Environmental Chemistry
E.C. Tuazon, R. Atkinson, "Tropospheric degradation products of CH2FCF3 (HFC-134a)," Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry, 16:301-12, 1993. (Cited in 10 publications through October 1994) Comments by Roger Atkinson The primary aim of this paper, according to its authors, was to evaluate the fate of the compound HFC-134a, one of a group of potential replacements for chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). These replacements are being examined as part of the "Alternative Fluorocarbon Environmental Acceptability

Technology

Hardware Systems Innovations Bring A 'Renaissance' To Microscopy
Hardware Systems Innovations Bring A 'Renaissance' To Microscopy
Selective microzapping_dubbed laser ablation, a highly accurate technique of micromanipulation that enables researchers to burn off or cut through cellular material without destroying surrounding tissue_offers exciting possibilities as a research tool. However, its benefits have been somewhat compromised because most conventional laser- ablation systems operate at fixed wavelengths, and use open- beam configurations that require great care in maintaining alignment. Often a system must be perfe

New Products

New Products
New Products
OmniFit Introduces Reagent BottlesFor Liquid Handling Systems Genzyme Offers Mouse And Human Cytokine ELISA Kits Hybridization Oven Goes Mini Larger Syringe Filters Available From Gelman Sciences Human TGF Beta-1 Antibody Reagent Anti-Thymine Dimer Monoclonal AntibodyFor Non-Radioactive DNA Probe Detection Wallac's New Cassettes Expand The Range Of MicroBeta PLUS Promega Unveils Protein Labeling And Detection System RevPro Adds FeaturesTo Table-Top Centrifuges Bal-Tec Announces Changes To Freez

Profession

Industry Becomes More Hospitable To The Scientist As New Mother
Industry Becomes More Hospitable To The Scientist As New Mother
The challenge of successfully combining the demands of family and career may be easing for women scientists in industry. With increasing numbers of women opting to work in private- sector research laboratories--and in the wake of the Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993--many firms have revamped maternity-leave policies to better accommodate new parenthood and the transition back to work. The recently enacted federal law ensures workers in companies with 50 or more employees 12 weeks of unpaid,
For 1950 Pennsylvania Grad, It's Back To School As Chairman Of University's Board Of Trustees, Japan Prize Honors A Biologist And His Field; Obituary
For 1950 Pennsylvania Grad, It's Back To School As Chairman Of University's Board Of Trustees, Japan Prize Honors A Biologist And His Field; Obituary
For 1950 Pennsylvania Grad, P. Roy Vagelos, It's Back To School As Chairman Of University's Board Of Trustees Japan Prize Honors A Biologist And His Field Obituary -- Betty McGee Vetter P. Roy Vagelos, who recently retired as chairman of the board of directors and chief executive officer of Merck and Co. Inc. in Whitehouse Station, N.J., assumed office as chairman of the University of Pennsylvania's board of trustees in October. He had been a member of the board since 1988. According to Va