News

African American Genome Mappers Pledge To Carry On Despite Grant Rejection
African American Genome Mappers Pledge To Carry On Despite Grant Rejection
Researchers working on a large-scale plan to develop a linkage map of the genome of African Americans a project similar to the Human Genome Project (HGP)_vow to continue their efforts, despite being rejected for funding by the National Institutes of Health. As they pursue other sources of funding, they say they will carry on with the project in a loosely associated alliance of smaller research efforts at Howard University and other institutions. "It is just too important a project to be dismant
Competing Attractions Of Private Research Prove Alluring To Top Academic Scientists
Competing Attractions Of Private Research Prove Alluring To Top Academic Scientists
Moves to companies by a small group of HHMI investigators shows the growing appeal of commercial- sector biological research jobs. Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigators are acknowledged to be among the most creative and accomplished basic researchers working in academic laboratories today. Yet even these top scientists sometimes feel the urge for a different set of challenges. Some long for the chance to develop useful new drugs and therapeutics based on their ideas or to run a larger,
New Wave Of Minority Science Programs Encouraging To Veteran Administrators
New Wave Of Minority Science Programs Encouraging To Veteran Administrators
Veteran Administrators Sidebar: MINORITY SCIENCE EDUCATION RESOURCES Researchers, educators, and government officials involved in the effort to increase representation of ethnic and racial minorities in science, mathematics, and engineering are encouraged by the comprehensive and business-like approaches of several projects that have been instituted in the last few years. They say this despite being critical of the majority of such programs because of a lack of effectiveness and accountability.
Fears Of Congressional Revision Cloud Clinton Budget Prospects
Fears Of Congressional Revision Cloud Clinton Budget Prospects
Policy-watchers wonder if even modest increases for science will survive Republican lawmakers' fiscal conservatism The Clinton administration is striving to put the best possible "spin" on its $72.9 billion research and development budget for the 1996 fiscal year, which would provide modest increases--about enough to keep pace with inflation--for the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health. White House science adviser John H. Gibbons contends that "science and technol
ACS Meeting Highlights Interface With Biology, Probes National Issues
ACS Meeting Highlights Interface With Biology, Probes National Issues
"So much to do, so little time" appears to sum up the busy program planned for the 209th national meeting and exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), to be held April 2-6 in the Convention Center and nearby hotels in Anaheim, Calif. The expected 10,000 participants will have a choice of attending more than 600 technical sessions, and more than 5,000 papers will be presented. The wide range of topics at this spring's meeting indicates the highly interdisciplinary nature of the field a
Minority Science Education Resources
Minority Science Education Resources
Following is a sampling of print- and computer-based directories of programs for minorities in science, mathematics, and engineering sponsored by professional societies, federal agencies, and universities. Some programs are not universal in whom they serve, but may vary according to minority or ethnic group, discipline, locale, and age group. HyperAMP, a three-part multimedia database of more than 1,400 financial aid sources for undergraduates and graduate students; a description of the Nationa
From Internal Guidelines To The Law
From Internal Guidelines To The Law
Delores Parron, associate director for special populations at the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) in Rockville, Md., refers to her office as the "mother cell," where the inclusion guidelines began. The NIMH office was put in place in 1983. Parron participated in a U.S. Public Health Service Task Force on Women's Health Issues from 1984 to 1985 that found, she states, "on those studies of diseases and disorders affecting men and women, to the greatest extent, women had been excluded."
Retention: Two Methods
Retention: Two Methods
New York University Medical Center is isolated on the edge of Manhattan's affluent Kip's Bay neighborhood, an area that includes only sparse pockets of subsidized lower- and middle-income housing. According to Kay Ryan, director of clinical trials development for the center, "Here, the patient population is not more than half minority, and here we have to do something to recruit minorities." "Something," in NYU's case, is recruiting patients for its cancer trials from Bellevue Hospital Center,
People: Two Alzheimer's Research Teams Net MetLife Medical Awards
People: Two Alzheimer's Research Teams Net MetLife Medical Awards
On February 15, the New York-based Metropolitan Life (MetLife) Foundation recognized two teams of biomedical scientists for the significance of their research and the collaborative nature of their work. The cash portion of the prize, known as the Awards for Medical Research, totaled $500,000. It was shared by the team of Robert W. Mahley, director of the Gladstone Institute of Cardiovascular Disease and a professor of pathology and medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, and Ka
People: Scripps Neuroscientist Named Science Editor
People: Scripps Neuroscientist Named Science Editor
Floyd E. Bloom, chairman of the neuropharmacology department at the Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, Calif., was named as the new editor-in-chief of Science last month. Bloom replaces Daniel E. Koshland, Jr., a University of California, Berkeley, molecular biologist who edited the journal for 10 years. According to the Washington, D.C.-based American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), which publishes Science, the multidisciplinary publication is the largest peer-reviewed

Opinion

Minority Pipeline: Science's Race Between Education And Catastrophe
Minority Pipeline: Science's Race Between Education And Catastrophe
Things could be worse. When The Scientist dedicates an issue to "minorities in science," we don't scratch our heads in wonder at the oxymoron, though we might have 30 years ago. There are many minority men and women in the sciences today, but not nearly enough. African, Hispanic, and Native Americans are clearly underrepresented in our laboratories, medical schools, and research centers. Their small numbers in these places of science are a deficit today that threatens to become an unrecoverable

Letter

Religious Scientists
Religious Scientists
I just wanted to congratulate you for publishing the article by Billy Goodman on religious scientists (The Scientist, Jan. 9, 1995, page 1). It seems that most scientific publications, and perhaps many scientists, are embarrassed by the fact that there are theists in their midst. Rather than try to understand the origins and implications of such faith, the scientific media tend to ignore its existence. As a Christian, I have long been confused by the attempts of my atheistic and agnostic collea
Smallpox Stores
Smallpox Stores
My opinion is that all known stocks of the smallpox virus should be destroyed as soon as possible. I disagree with the premise of the late Bernard Fields's argument (quoted in K.Y. Kreeger, The Scientist, Nov. 14, 1994, page 1) that "destroying it ends the whole issue of possibly understanding it in the future." The only moral, humane reason for a scientist to study a virulent microbe is to obtain the minimum amount of information needed for its eradication_that is, how to create an effective v

Profession

HIGHEST NIH FY1994 R01* AWARDS WITH ADEQUATE MINORITY REPRESENTATION
HIGHEST NIH FY1994 R01* AWARDS WITH ADEQUATE MINORITY REPRESENTATION
HIGHEST NIH FY1994 R01* AWARDS WITH ADEQUATE MINORITY REPRESENTATION Date: March 6, 1995 Principal Study Name Amount Guy L. Clifton,Univ.Texas Health Sciences CenterNational Acute Brain Injury Study--Hypothermia $2,271,836 Maria J. Wawer,Columbia Univ. STD Control for AIDS Prevention 1,647,905 John C.S.Breitner,Duke Univ.Epidemiology of Alzheimer's Dementia 1,558,317 Paolo G. Toniolo,NYU Med. Ctr. Women's Health Study 1,053,779 Larry C. Clark,Univ. of Arizon Nutritional Pre
FROM INTERNAL GUIDELINES TO THE LAW
FROM INTERNAL GUIDELINES TO THE LAW
FROM INTERNAL GUIDELINES TO THE LAW Date: March 6, 1995 Delores Parron, associate director for special populations at the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) in Rockville, Md., refers to her office as the "mother cell," where the inclusion guidelines began. The NIMH office was put in place in 1983. Parron participated in a U.S. Public Health Service Task Force on Women's Health Issues from 1984 to 1985 that found, she states, "on those studies of diseases and disorders af
Building Professional Success As A Minority Scientist, Person-To-Person
Building Professional Success As A Minority Scientist, Person-To-Person
The world of science has no shortage of formal programs aimed at assisting the career advancement of members of racial or ethnic minorities. But these programs alone--effective as some can be--are not enough to overcome the professional barriers that scientists in these chronically underrepresented groups often confront, according to minority researchers. "Students have to understand that these minority programs generally only get them to first base," says Eloy Rodriguez, Cornell University's J

Research

NIH Applicants Adapt To Study-Population Inclusion Guidelines
NIH Applicants Adapt To Study-Population Inclusion Guidelines
A federal law requiring National Institutes of Health-funded disease studies to show an adequate representation of women, minorities, and racial and ethnic subgroups is forcing researchers to adopt novel methods of inclusion. These methods often go far beyond incorporating minority groups into their research design plans. Means that investigators have adopted to attract and retain populations that conform to the new law include buying lunch, paying bus fare, opening satellite clinics, even goin
RETENTION: TWO METHODS
RETENTION: TWO METHODS
RETENTION: TWO METHODS Date: March 6, 1995 New York University Medical Center is isolated on the edge of Manhattan's affluent Kip's Bay neighborhood, an area that includes only sparse pockets of subsidized lower- and middle- income housing. According to Kay Ryan, director of clinical trials development for the center, "Here, the patient population is not more than half minority, and here we have to do something to recruit minorities." "Something," in NYU's case, is recruiting pa

Hot Paper

Cancer Therapy
Cancer Therapy
Edited by : Neeraja Sankaran C. Fleming, J.H. Wasson, P. Albertsen, M.J. Barry, J. E. Wennberg, "A decision analysis of alternative treatment strategies for clinically localized prostate cancer," Journal of the American Medical Association, 269:2650-8, 1993. (Cited in 88 publications through January 1995) Comments by Craig Fleming, HealthOutcomes Associates, Vancouver, Wash. This evaluation of the relative efficacy of therapies for localized prostate cancer is part of a multi-institutional st
Biochemistry
Biochemistry
Edited by: Neeraja Sankaran S.A. Lipton, Y.B. Choi, Z.H. Pan, S.Z. Lei, H.S.V. Chen, N.J. Sucher, J. Loscalzo, D.J. Sibgel, J.S. Stamler, "A redox-based mechanism for the neuroprotective and neurodestructive effects of nitric oxide and related nitroso-compounds," Nature, 364:626-32, 1993. (Cited in 127 publications through January 1995) Comments by Stuart A. Lipton, Harvard Medical School, and Jonathan S. Stamler, Duke University This paper describes the effects of redox-related forms of nitric

Technology

Centrifuge Improvements Put New Spin On A Laboratory Workhorse
Centrifuge Improvements Put New Spin On A Laboratory Workhorse
A true laboratory workhorse, the centrifuge has been an essential part of most biological labs for many years. Using centrifugal force obtained by spinning experimental samples at high revolutions per minute (rpm), the device functions as a preparative method to separate various sample components, within minutes, for further treatment. Ultracentrifugation is an even more powerful technique that is used in analytical studies involving the characterization of and interactions between biological m

Notebook

Notebook
Notebook
Shake-and-Bake Structures JASON Vs. The Volcano Something's Aflutter Is Race Passe? Unimpressed By The Press What Next--Wonderbras? Party Time Unsung Heroines No Accounting For Ethics Researchers at the University of Buffalo and its Hauptman- Woodward Medical Research Institute have developed a computer program--used in conjunction with a software package developed by Houston-based Molecular Structure Corp.--that will solve the structure of large biomolecules. The program is called Shake-and-B