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D Remains Stagnant Despite Scientific Advances
D Remains Stagnant Despite Scientific Advances
SIDEBAR: Mired in Politics: Emergency Contraceptives And Abortifacients LITTLE PROGRESS NOTED: "Why should a pharmaceutical company take these risks?" asks pioneer Carl Djerassi. Although the molecular biology revolution is in full swing and potential new products abound, basic methods of birth control have changed little in the 36 years since the contraceptive pill was introduced. Indeed, some scientists believe that political and economic pressures will keep most contraceptive advances -- e
Blood-Brain Barrier Booming As A Source Of New Biotechnology Research Challenges
Blood-Brain Barrier Booming As A Source Of New Biotechnology Research Challenges
Industry observers predict increased opportunities as firms set their sights on novel techniques for drug delivery. 'HUGE EXPLOSION: Many potentially therapeutic brain molecules are a boon, asserts Richard Pops. Finding ways to sneak therapeutic drugs past the seemingly impenetrable blood-brain barrier -- a tightly bound wall of endothelial cells that protects the brain from pathogens and other substances -- is keeping a small cadre of biotech firms busy. Researchers at these companies, as
NSF Report Paints Grim Picture Of Undergrad Science Education
NSF Report Paints Grim Picture Of Undergrad Science Education
'HOW SCIENCE WORKS': William Hammer emphasizes hands-on learning in his course. A recent report from the National Science Foundation warns that most of the thousands of schoolteachers returning to their classrooms this month were ill-prepared during their undergraduate years to teach science to their students. The report, "Shaping the Future: New Expectations for Undergraduate Education in Science, Mathematics, Engineering, and Technology," is generating widespread agreement that much improv
Science 'Magnet' High School Programs Growing In Popularity, Variety
Science 'Magnet' High School Programs Growing In Popularity, Variety
Increasing numbers of the students returning to high school this fall will take all or part of their classes in "magnet" schools or programs that emphasize math, science, and technology. Whether they are residential academies that attract top scholars or part-day programs for students seeking exposure to technical careers, these specialized public school offerings are designed to draw students with similar interests and talents. OPPORTUNITY: North Carolina magnet student Christiane Haeffele p
Mired In Politics: Emergency Contraceptives And Abortifacients
Mired In Politics: Emergency Contraceptives And Abortifacients
When the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) made an unprecedented announcement in July that, absent standard FDA-approval procedures, oral contraceptive pills in high doses are safe and effective for emergency contraception -- the so-called morning-after pill -- it was giving its imprimatur to a well-established use (T. Lewin, New York Times, July 1, 1996, page A1). An Institute of Medicine (IOM) report released in May (P.F. Harrison, A. Rosenfield, eds., Contraceptive Research a
Magnet School Resources
Magnet School Resources
National Consortium for Specialized Secondary Schools of Mathematics, Science and Technology (NCSSSMST) Richard Loftin, president 52 institutional members, 50 affiliate members c/o Lousiana School for Math, Science, and the Arts 715 College Ave., Natchitoches, La. 71457 (318) 357-3255 - Fax: (318) 357-3271 - E-mail: loftin@nsula.edu http://www.inmind.com/schools/NCSSSMST Magnet Schools of America Donald Waldrip, executive director 500 institutional members 2111 Holly Hall, Suite 704, Hous
The Scientist - Crossword Puzzle - September 19, 1996
The Scientist - Crossword Puzzle - September 19, 1996
By Eric Albert Email: ealbert@world.std.com ACROSS 1 Amoeba or ostrich egg, e.g. 3 Batting order? 9 Process at one end of the alimentary canal 11 Acid type 12 Acetone is the simplest one 13 Lung-covering membrane 16 Presence of microorganisms in the blood 19 34 Across + 000 21 Element discovered in 1898 22 Furlong/20,116.8 24 Loss of Muscle coordination 26 Natural numbers as compared to integers, say 31 Kind of bond 32 Process at one end of the alimentary canal 33 Specialized chromosome region

Clarification

Clarification
Clarification
The article "Looking Back At Jenner, Vaccine Developers Prepare For 21st Century" (K.S. Brown, The Scientist, April 1, 1996, page 14) reported incorrect information concerning clinical trials of Malvern, Pa.-based Apollon Inc.'s HIV-directed, DNA-based vaccine. The Phase I/II clinical trial is being conducted at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, Md. University of Pennsylvania investigators, under the direction of David Weiner, collaborated in the development of the

Opinion

Legal Process Presented In Ryan Report Requires Reconsideration
Legal Process Presented In Ryan Report Requires Reconsideration
Since their release earlier this year, the recommendations of the congressionally chartered Commission on Research Integrity (CRI) have generated ongoing controversy (B. Goodman, The Scientist, Jan. 22, 1996, page 1; B. Goodman, The Scientist, July 22, 1996, page 3). It should surprise no one that the report containing those recommendations has been the subject of much debate. The commission, chaired by Kenneth Ryan, was required by its charter to perform a difficult balancing act: juggling th

Commentary

The Future Of Biomedical Funding Depends On You
The Future Of Biomedical Funding Depends On You
Americans today live longer and are healthier in general than any other time in history. Much of this success is due to the government's willingness to strongly support biomedical research. Unfortunately, this support is constantly under attack despite rapid advances in molecular technology that potentially could offer medical treatments or cures. Traditionally, biomedical scientists and physicians have not been effective as political activists. As a group we have been more involved in runnin

Leaders of Science

John W. Suttie
John W. Suttie
The Scientist Date: September 16, 1996 THE SCIENTIST® The Newspaper for the Life Sciences Professional "THE SCIENTIST provides a good overview of topics of interest to the scientific community. It provides useful information on public policy issues and advances in the biological sciences." John W. Suttie, Professor and Chairman.Department of Nutritional Sciences and Professor Department of Biochemistry, University of Wisconsin, Madison John W. Suttie, professor and chairman, department

Letter

A Research Tax
A Research Tax
I applaud Lorraine Lasker's recent Opinion article (The Scientist, June 10, 1996, page 10) proposing an innovative way to increase federal biomedical research funding. Unfortunately, a voluntary check-off plan will generate relatively little money, and I feel that this proposal does not go far enough. As an academic community, let us advocate a bolder and more productive plan. Let us tax all nonacademic health care providers (managed care organizations, health maintenance organizations, hospit
'A Delightful Irony'
'A Delightful Irony'
I found the article by Irving M. Klotz describing the claims of postmodernist philosophers about the supposedly evanescent nature of scientific facts very interesting and enlightening (The Scientist, July 22, 1996, page 9). I have listened in incredulity as scientific colleagues have recounted the arguments of devotees of postmodernist philosophy, and come away feeling relieved that I have never had to contend with any of them personally. The article by Klotz further heightens my amazement tha

Research

Unraveling The Biochemistry of Fat Metabolism
Unraveling The Biochemistry of Fat Metabolism
Biochemical InterestBelieved MechanismPotential Drug Leptin receptorWhen mutated, resists leptin bindingRepairs receptor; creates tailored leptin-like molecule Neuropeptide YStimulates carbohydrate cravingNPY antagonist GalaninStimulates fat intake and lowers insulin levelGalanin antagonist CholecystokininSignals brain to stop eatingCCK agonist DopamineSignals brain to stop eatingDopamine/fatty acid combination drug
A Full Plate: Researchers Attempt To Digest The Biochemistry Of Obesity
A Full Plate: Researchers Attempt To Digest The Biochemistry Of Obesity
SIDEBAR: Unraveling The Biochemistry Of Fat Metabolism Following research on obesity is a little like ordering ^È la carte. Current studies offer at least five weight-related genes, three brain proteins, and a half-dozen mutations. During the past six years, academic and industry researchers have blended these ingredients into at least 11 anti-obesity drugs now in development. Scientists hope to craft drugs that will travel the trail blazed by Redux (dexfenfluramine), the first weight-loss

Hot Paper

Free Radical Biology
Free Radical Biology
Edited by: Karen Young Kreeger H. Rubbo, R. Radi, M. Trujillo, R. Telleri, B. Kalyanaraman, S. Barnes, M. Kirk, B.A. Freeman, "Nitric oxide regulation of superoxide and peroxynitrite-dependent lipid peroxidation," Journal of Biological Chemistry, 269:26066-75, 1994. (Cited in more than 70 publications as of August 1996) Comments by Bruce Freeman, University of Alabama, Birmingham Understanding the chemical actions of nitric oxide (NO)-- a free radical species that acts as a mediator of signa
Immunology
Immunology
Edited by: Karen Young Kreeger MAKING A MIGHTY MOUSE: Yale's Richard Flavell and coworkers developed a CD40 ligand-less knockout mouse. J.C. Xu, T.M. Foy, J.D. Laman, E.A. Elliott, J.J. Dunn, T.J. Waldschmidt, J. ore, R.J. Noelle, R.A. Flavell, "Mice deficient for the CD40 ligand," Immunity, 1:423-31, 1994 (Cited in more than 80 publications as of August 1996) Comments by Richard A. Flavell, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Yale University School of Medicine To more closely investigate the

Profession

Scientists Report That Communicating With Congress Is Simple, Effective
Scientists Report That Communicating With Congress Is Simple, Effective
SIDEBAR : Sources For Help In Contacting Congress TIMES CHANGE: Robert Park says scientists can no longer afford to rest on their laurels. With continuing calls for massive cuts in federal R&D spending, scientists are finding it ever more important to lobby Congress for continued funding. Those who have taken the plunge report that lobbying Congress is easier, more productive, and less aversive than it may appear. "For years we felt that what we do is so important that anyone but a fool
Sources For Help In Contacting Congress
Sources For Help In Contacting Congress
American Association for the Advancement of Science 1200 New York Ave., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20005 (800) 731-4939 ¤ Fax: (202) 842-1065 http://www.aaas.org American Institute of Physics One Physics Ellipse , College Park, Md. 20740-3843 (301) 209-3100 ¤ Fax: (301) 209-0843 http://www.aip.org American Physical Society One Physics Ellipse, College Park, Md. 20740-3843 (301) 209-3200 ¤ Fax: (301) 209-0867 http://www.aps.org FASEB 9650 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, Md. 20814 (301)

Technology

Many Factors Must Be Weighed In Decision To Purchase Antibodies
Many Factors Must Be Weighed In Decision To Purchase Antibodies
Sidebars New Antibody Technologies On Tap? Selected Suppliers of Antibodies During the past decade, few biological disciplines have captivated researchers as dramatically as immunology. Of particular interest are the molecules known as antibodies -- naturally occurring immune system proteins that seek out and bind to a virtually unlimited number of antigens, peptides, receptors, infectious organisms, other proteins, and so on. Their remarkable specificity and selectivity have driven the growt
New Antibody Technologies On Tap?
New Antibody Technologies On Tap?
Large volumes of antibodies for diagnostic, treatment, and research have traditionally been produced by only three methods: ascites (that is, in living animals), fermentation or stirred-tank reactors, and hollow-fiber bioreactors. Each has its own advantages. The ascites method, while highly labor-intensive, is generally recommended for the relatively economical production of small volumes of antibodies -- typically milligrams or less. Stirred-tank reactors are widely used for larger commercia
SELECTED SUPPLIERS OF ANTIBODIES
SELECTED SUPPLIERS OF ANTIBODIES
SELECTED SUPPLIERS OF ANTIBODIES Date: September 16, 1996 Accurate Chemical and Scientific Corp. Affinity BioReagents Inc. Antigenix America Inc BioDesign International BioSource International Inc. BioWhittaker Inc. Chemicon International Inc. Lampire Biological Laboratories Pierce Chemical Co.

New Products

New Products
New Products
New Products - The Scientist - September 16, 1996 Integrated HPLC Recovery System Debuts The IRS2000 is designed for recycling the mobile phase of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analyses that are not contaminated by sample analytes. According to the company, the instrument reduces isocratic solvent consumption up to 80 percent, reportedly lowering waste disposal costs, preparation time, and environmental impact. The enhanced instrument features five operating mo

Notebook

Notebook
Notebook
PEACEMAKER: Award-winner David Kritchevsky said he wanted "to prevent squabbles". David Kritchevsky received no official advance notice that he would receive the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR)'s first-ever Research Achievement Award, but he had been told it would be a good idea to attend AICR's annual research conference, held late last month in Washington, D.C., the organization's home city. "They didn't just pull me off the street," recalls Kritchevsky, the Institute Professo
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