Bat perching upside down in a cave.
Some Bats Buzz Like Hornets to Deter Predators
The behavior is the first example of a mammal mimicking a more-dangerous species.
ABOVE: Marco Scalisi
Some Bats Buzz Like Hornets to Deter Predators
Some Bats Buzz Like Hornets to Deter Predators

The behavior is the first example of a mammal mimicking a more-dangerous species.

The behavior is the first example of a mammal mimicking a more-dangerous species.

ABOVE: Marco Scalisi

acoustics

Several tadpoles in clear eggs
Slideshow: How Animal Embryos Eavesdrop on the Outside World
Amanda Heidt | Nov 1, 2021
Watch and listen to reptiles, amphibians, insects, and birds respond to sound from inside their eggs.
Eavesdropping on Soil Insects Could Aid Pest Management
Michael Graw | Nov 1, 2019
Insects in the soil are difficult to monitor, but listening in on the noises they make could help farmers detect pest infestations and improve estimates of biodiversity.
Unhatched Gulls Shake Their Shells to Warn Siblings of Danger
Nicoletta Lanese | Jul 23, 2019
The unborn chicks translate auditory alarms from adult birds into quaking vibrations.
Infographic: Shaken Loose
Ruth Williams | Dec 1, 2018
How acoustic waves let researchers measure whether, and how firmly, cells are bound to a substrate
Image of the Day: Acoustic Camouflage
Kerry Grens | Nov 14, 2018
Moths’ scales vibrate in the frequency range of bats’ echolocation calls, perhaps helping the insects to avoid predation.
Image of the Day: Ear Candy
Sukanya Charuchandra | Jun 14, 2018
Scientists recorded three different types of narwhal sounds in East Greenland.  
The Caterpillar that Cries Wolf
Mary Bates | Sep 22, 2017
In a case of acoustic deception, caterpillars mimic bird alarm calls to defend themselves.
A Rainforest Chorus
Karen Zusi | Dec 1, 2015
Researchers measure the health of Papua New Guinea’s forests by analyzing the ecological soundscape.
Jungle Field Trip
The Scientist Staff | Nov 30, 2015
Travel to remote rain forests in Papua New Guinea with researchers from The Nature Conservancy who are working with native people to characterize ecosystems there using sound.
Whaling Specimens, 1930s
Amanda B. Keener | Sep 1, 2015
Fetal specimens collected by commercial whalers offer insights into how whales may have evolved their specialized hearing organs.