Chemosensory Cells in the Nose Play a Role in Allergic Reactions
Chemosensory Cells in the Nose Play a Role in Allergic Reactions
In mice, a group of nasal epithelial cells called brush cells release pro-inflammatory signals in response to allergens.
Chemosensory Cells in the Nose Play a Role in Allergic Reactions
Chemosensory Cells in the Nose Play a Role in Allergic Reactions

In mice, a group of nasal epithelial cells called brush cells release pro-inflammatory signals in response to allergens.

In mice, a group of nasal epithelial cells called brush cells release pro-inflammatory signals in response to allergens.

asthma
Pregnant Moms’ Air Pollution Exposure May Affect Babies’ Health
Pregnant Moms’ Air Pollution Exposure May Affect Babies’ Health
Chia-Yi Hou | Sep 23, 2019
A number of epidemiological studies support a link between air quality and poor health outcomes, and researchers are searching for explanations in the lab.
Study: Fish Oil During Pregnancy May Lower Asthma Risk in Children
Study: Fish Oil During Pregnancy May Lower Asthma Risk in Children
Ben Andrew Henry | Dec 29, 2016
Pregnant women who took a fish oil supplement during pregnancy were less likely to have children with asthma.
Neonatal Gut Bacteria Might Promote Asthma
Neonatal Gut Bacteria Might Promote Asthma
Anna Azvolinsky | Sep 12, 2016
Byproducts of gut microbes in some 1-month–old babies trigger inflammation that is linked to later asthma development, researchers find.
Study: Nail-Biters, Thumb-Suckers Have Fewer Allergies
Study: Nail-Biters, Thumb-Suckers Have Fewer Allergies
Tanya Lewis | Jul 11, 2016
The findings of a longitudinal study in New Zealand lend support to the hygiene hypothesis.
Gut Bacteria Linked to Asthma Risk
Gut Bacteria Linked to Asthma Risk
Jef Akst | Oct 1, 2015
Four types of gut bacteria found in babies’ stool may help researchers predict the future development of asthma.
<em>The Scientist</em> on The Pulse #3
The Scientist on The Pulse #3
Kerry Grens | Jan 28, 2014
Kerry Grens chats about ancient tooth decay, asthma, and fat cells.
Fiber-Rich Diet Cuts Asthma in Mice
Fiber-Rich Diet Cuts Asthma in Mice
Kerry Grens | Jan 7, 2014
Scientists show that fiber’s influence on gut microbes affects the lungs’ response to allergens.
Dangers of Second-Generation Smoke
Dangers of Second-Generation Smoke
Beth Marie Mole | Nov 4, 2012
Nicotine leaves epigenetic marks on the rat genome that make offspring and grand-offspring more prone to asthma.  
Dogs May Guard Against Asthma
Hayley Dunning | Jul 3, 2012
Mice become immune to a virus associated with childhood asthma when exposed to dust from homes that have dogs.