Infographic: Animals of Different Species Hybridize
Infographic: Animals of Different Species Hybridize
The offspring of crosses between related species can sometimes fill a new environmental niche, and such hybridizations may even lead to speciation.
Infographic: Animals of Different Species Hybridize
Infographic: Animals of Different Species Hybridize

The offspring of crosses between related species can sometimes fill a new environmental niche, and such hybridizations may even lead to speciation.

The offspring of crosses between related species can sometimes fill a new environmental niche, and such hybridizations may even lead to speciation.

biodiversity
Australian Government Adds a Dozen Animals to Extinct List
Australian Government Adds a Dozen Animals to Extinct List
Kerry Grens | Mar 3, 2021
The species include the first reptile to be listed and the Christmas Island pipistrelle, a bat last seen in 2009.
Science with Borders: Researchers Navigate Red Tape
Science with Borders: Researchers Navigate Red Tape
Max Kozlov | Mar 1, 2021
Scientists who work with foreign biological specimens face a patchwork of permits that threaten to block their projects, with potentially harmful consequences for the ecosystems they study.
Q&A: Parachute Science in Coral Reef Research
Q&A: Parachute Science in Coral Reef Research
Asher Jones | Feb 24, 2021
Scientists who study the marine ecosystems have frequently failed to involve local researchers in projects, a study finds.
Bee Reports over the Past Century Indicate a Loss of Diversity
Bee Reports over the Past Century Indicate a Loss of Diversity
Asher Jones | Jan 22, 2021
An analysis of museum data and naturalists' observations finds that the number of bee species recorded has been declining since the 1990s. The first global, long-term study of bee trends adds to mounting evidence that the pollinators are in trouble worldwide.
Q&A: Global Insect Declines Due to “Death by a Thousand Cuts”
Q&A: Global Insect Declines Due to “Death by a Thousand Cuts”
Asher Jones | Jan 15, 2021
University of Connecticut entomologist David Wagner speaks with The Scientist about his biggest concerns for global insect populations and recommendations for actions to help save these tiny but important creatures.
Farming Associated with Long-Term Decline in Marmot Populations
Farming Associated with Long-Term Decline in Marmot Populations
Shawna Williams | Dec 1, 2020
Images from a Cold War spy satellite help researchers piece together the effects of land-use decisions in Kazakhstan.
Ten Bird Species Newly Identified on Indonesian Islands
Ten Bird Species Newly Identified on Indonesian Islands
Emily Makowski | Jan 10, 2020
Flycatchers, warblers, and more were spotted in a biodiverse region known as Wallacea.
Image of the Day: Beetle Evolution
Image of the Day: Beetle Evolution
Emily Makowski | Nov 19, 2019
Plants, fungi, and bacteria likely contributed to insect diversity.
Image of the Day: Bubbling Plants
Image of the Day: Bubbling Plants
Emily Makowski | Nov 18, 2019
Plants use two different strategies to photosynthesize underwater.
Proposed Deep-Sea Mining Zone Harbors Previously Unknown Species
Proposed Deep-Sea Mining Zone Harbors Previously Unknown Species
Catherine Offord | Oct 17, 2019
The discovery of ancient clades of brittle stars at the bottom of the Pacific Ocean adds to concerns that commercial exploitation of the area could destroy numerous taxa before they’ve even been identified.
Image of the Day: Floating Frog
Image of the Day: Floating Frog
Emily Makowski | Oct 4, 2019
A frog performs a balancing act in a region where amphibians are threatened.
North America Has 3 Billion Fewer Birds Than it Did in 1970
North America Has 3 Billion Fewer Birds Than it Did in 1970
Catherine Offord | Sep 19, 2019
Population reductions in species such as sparrows and blackbirds reflect a concerning pattern of declining biodiversity across the continent, researchers find.
Agriculture and Climate Shape Biodiversity on Mount Kilimanjaro
Agriculture and Climate Shape Biodiversity on Mount Kilimanjaro
Michael Graw | Jul 15, 2019
A six-year study across the Tanzanian mountain’s slopes hints at how land-use practices will interact with a changing climate to influence ecosystems around the world.
Global Biodiversity Assessment Reports “Unprecedented” Declines
Global Biodiversity Assessment Reports “Unprecedented” Declines
Chia-Yi Hou | May 6, 2019
The intergovernmental organization reports “accelerating” species extinctions, with 25 percent of animal and plant species evaluated under threat of extinction.
Nearly 200,000 Viral Populations Live in the World’s Oceans
Nearly 200,000 Viral Populations Live in the World’s Oceans
Chia-Yi Hou | Apr 26, 2019
Researchers analyze 146 samples from close to 80 sites, with nearly a third of samples coming from the Arctic Ocean.
Antarctic Emperor Penguin Colony Faces Collapse
Antarctic Emperor Penguin Colony Faces Collapse
Jef Akst | Apr 25, 2019
After three years with very few new chicks, the birds are abandoning one of the biggest breeding sites on the continent, satellite images show.
Prehistoric Microbes Inhabit an Oasis in the Northern Mexican Desert
Prehistoric Microbes Inhabit an Oasis in the Northern Mexican Desert
Diana Kwon | Mar 1, 2019
The blue lagoons of the Cuatro Ciénegas Basin provide a glimpse into the planet’s ancient past.
Tortoise Not Seen for 113 Years Found on Galapagos Island
Tortoise Not Seen for 113 Years Found on Galapagos Island
Carolyn Wilke | Feb 25, 2019
Chelonoidis phantasticus, or the Fernandina giant tortoise, was feared extinct until an expedition found a lone female in a remote area on the island of Fernandina.