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Illustration of green fluorescent bacterial cells.
Cocaine Use Creates Feedback Loop with Gut Bacteria: Mouse Study
A jolt of norepinephrine in the mouse gut facilitates colonization by certain microbes, which in turn deplete glycine, enhancing cocaine-induced behaviors.
Cocaine Use Creates Feedback Loop with Gut Bacteria: Mouse Study
Cocaine Use Creates Feedback Loop with Gut Bacteria: Mouse Study

A jolt of norepinephrine in the mouse gut facilitates colonization by certain microbes, which in turn deplete glycine, enhancing cocaine-induced behaviors.

A jolt of norepinephrine in the mouse gut facilitates colonization by certain microbes, which in turn deplete glycine, enhancing cocaine-induced behaviors.

C. rodentium
Image of the Day: Flushing the Gut
The Scientist Staff | Jun 19, 2017 | 1 min read
In response to a bacterial infection, an immune signal in mice's guts triggers a molecular cascade that promotes diarrhea, which, researchers demonstrate, is important for ridding them of the bacteria.  
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