Photo of Romaine River in Quebec
Microbial Analysis of River Reveals Considerable Diversity
Scientists in Canada trace how aquatic communities change as Quebec’s Romaine River flows into the sea.
Microbial Analysis of River Reveals Considerable Diversity
Microbial Analysis of River Reveals Considerable Diversity

Scientists in Canada trace how aquatic communities change as Quebec’s Romaine River flows into the sea.

Scientists in Canada trace how aquatic communities change as Quebec’s Romaine River flows into the sea.

carbon cycle
microscope image of methaotrophs with black specks
Deep Sea Microbes Produce Graphite-like Carbon
Chloe Tenn | Nov 11, 2021
The first evidence of biologically produced elemental carbon inspires more questions than answers.  
dead fish piled in boxes along a pier, with a boat and snowy mountains in the background
Fish Poop a Big Player in Ocean Carbon Sequestration
Katarina Zimmer | Oct 8, 2021
A modeling study estimates that by drastically reducing fish biomass over the past century, industrial fishing may be affecting ocean chemistry, nutrient fluxes, and carbon cycling as much as climate change.
atmosphere atmospheric microbe microbes photosynthesis France cloud rain microbiology algae cyanobacteria
Clouds and Rain Carry a Menagerie of Photosynthetic Microbes
Chia-Yi Hou | Jun 24, 2019
Microbiologists identify diatoms, algae, and cyanobacteria species from samples above a mountaintop in France.
wood-boring clam
Image of the Day: Not What You Think
Carolyn Wilke | Apr 4, 2019
Newly discovered and rather phallic-looking clams dwell at the bottom of the ocean and are some of only a few animals known to eat wood.  

Life Deep Underground Is Twice the Volume of the Oceans: Study
Carolyn Wilke | Dec 11, 2018
Scientists estimate that subterranean organisms constitute a massive amount of carbon, 245 to 385 times greater than that contained in all humans.
Sinking Carbon
Jim Daley | Jul 1, 2018
With samples taken from the crust of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, researchers have discovered where some of the oceans’ dissolved organic carbon winds up.
Deep-Sea Viruses Destroy Archaea
Ruth Williams | Oct 12, 2016
Viruses are responsible for the majority of archaea deaths on the deep ocean floors, scientists show.
Archaea’s Role in Carbon Cycle
Catherine Offord | Jun 30, 2016
Bathyarchaeota undergo acetogenesis, generating organic carbon below the seafloor.
An Ocean of Viruses
Joshua S. Weitz and Steven W. Wilhelm | Jul 1, 2013
Viruses abound in the world’s oceans, yet researchers are only beginning to understand how they affect life and chemistry from the water’s surface to the sea floor.
Sea Bugs
Joshua S. Weitz and Steven W. Wilhelm | Jun 30, 2013
Ocean viruses can impact marine ecosystems in several ways.
Microbes Thrive in Deepest Ocean
Sabrina Richards | Mar 17, 2013
Researchers find remarkably active bacteria in the Mariana Trench, where they live under pressure 1,000 times greater than at the surface.