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Nobel Prize Winner Faces Investigation into Paper Integrity
Seventeen studies coauthored by Gregg Semenza have been retracted, corrected, or raised for concern, and 15 more are currently under investigation.
Nobel Prize Winner Faces Investigation into Paper Integrity
Nobel Prize Winner Faces Investigation into Paper Integrity

Seventeen studies coauthored by Gregg Semenza have been retracted, corrected, or raised for concern, and 15 more are currently under investigation.

Seventeen studies coauthored by Gregg Semenza have been retracted, corrected, or raised for concern, and 15 more are currently under investigation.

cell and molecular biology
Robert Simoni, Stanford University, biochemistry, cholesterol, cell membrane, obituary
Robert Simoni, Cellular Membrane Biochemist, Dies at 81
Amanda Heidt | Sep 25, 2020 | 3 min read
Simoni spent more than four decades at Stanford University as a teacher, researcher, and administrator in the university’s biology department.
Roger Unger, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, type 1, type 2, glucagon, insulin, leptin, lipotoxicity, University of Texas Southwestern, endocrinology, hormone, obituary
Roger Unger, Endocrinologist and Authority on Diabetes, Dies
Amanda Heidt | Sep 4, 2020 | 2 min read
The University of Texas Southwestern scientist studied the roles of glucagon and insulin in regulating blood glucose, leading to several successful treatments.
Revealing the Complexities of Cancer with Single-cell RNA Analysis
The Scientist Creative Services Team | 1 min read
Download this eBook to learn how single-cell analysis identifies subpopulations of tumor cells!
Image of the Day: Meiosis Researcher, Olympic Hopeful
Amy Schleunes | Feb 26, 2020 | 2 min read
Olivia Ballew, a graduate student at Indiana University, is currently writing her dissertation while preparing to compete in the upcoming Olympic marathon trials.
Timing and Order of Molecular Events Recorded in Live Cells’ DNA
Ruth Williams | Aug 22, 2019 | 3 min read
Genetic engineers have co-opted base editing machinery to enable information storage and processing in the DNA of bacterial and mammalian cells.
A Toolmaker
The Scientist Staff | Jun 1, 2019 | 1 min read
Meet the University of Toronto’s Yu Sun, whose work developing magnetic tweezers is featured in our Modus Operandi column.
Image of the Day: Life and Death
Carolyn Wilke | Mar 22, 2019 | 1 min read
When hair follicle stem cells lose their protein-based death cue, they take on a new role helping to repair wounds in skin.
Image of the Day: Dystrophin Restored
Carolyn Wilke | Mar 21, 2019 | 1 min read
CRISPRed heart muscle cells from humans gain the ability to make a protein missing in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.
Does Sharing the Womb with a Brother Affect Girls?
Ashley Yeager | Mar 19, 2019 | 2 min read
A study links having a male twin with women’s educational, financial, and childbearing decisions. Researchers suspect prenatal exposure to testosterone may play a role.
Image of the Day: Organ Crosstalk
Carolyn Wilke | Mar 19, 2019 | 1 min read
Zooming in on the ovarioles of Drosophila could reveal links between muscles, nutrition, and the development of eggs.
Image of the Day: Sperm Donors
Carolyn Wilke | Mar 18, 2019 | 1 min read
Asexual female nematodes use their male offsprings’ sperm to fertilize eggs, but cast away their genes.
Gene-Edited Soybean Oil Makes Restaurant Debut
Carolyn Wilke | Mar 13, 2019 | 2 min read
A Minnesota-based company reports the sale of a soybean oil engineered to have greater stability and no trans-fat.
Image of the Day: Squid Skin
Carolyn Wilke | Mar 13, 2019 | 1 min read
The cephalopods use several strategies to manipulate light and produce their colorful patterns.
Image of the Day: Double Header
Carolyn Wilke | Mar 8, 2019 | 1 min read
Scientists have manipulated the electrical signals that help guide flatworms in regenerating their body parts to encourage a flatworm to grow two heads.
Image of the Day: Metastatic Moment
Carolyn Wilke | Feb 27, 2019 | 1 min read
A human breast cancer cell divides as it moves through surrounding blood vessel cells in vitro.
Image of the Day: Neon Collective
Carolyn Wilke | Feb 13, 2019 | 1 min read
Human lung cancer cells can form an invasive pack that coordinates its movement during metastasis.  
Image of the Day: Nature by Hand
Carolyn Wilke | Jan 4, 2019 | 1 min read
Scientist D. Allan Drummond’s study of life in sculpture aims to provoke curiosity and wonder about the world.
Image of the Day: Blood and Guts
Carolyn Wilke | Dec 13, 2018 | 1 min read
Researchers find that stem cells in the human intestine may provide up to 10 percent of circulating blood cells.
Image of the Day: Cellular Destiny
Carolyn Wilke | Dec 11, 2018 | 1 min read
Progenitor cells in the pancreas of humans get developmental cues from proteins in their environment.
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