chemosensory
Making Sense of the Narwhal Tusk
Making Sense of the Narwhal Tusk
Kerry Grens | Mar 18, 2014
Emerging evidence suggests that the marine mammal’s long front tooth might help the narwhal sense environmental changes.  
Feeding Frenzy
Feeding Frenzy
Mary Bates | Mar 1, 2014
Take a peek into the shark tank where Boston University biologist Jelle Atema is testing how well the fish actually smell.
Jaws, Reconsidered
Jaws, Reconsidered
Mary Bates | Mar 1, 2014
Biologist Jelle Atema is putting the sensory capabilities of sharks to the test—and finding that the truth is more fascinating than fiction.
Fly Leg Sensors Recognize Mates
Fly Leg Sensors Recognize Mates
Chris Palmer | Jul 1, 2013
Male fruit flies use a sensory system in their legs to help determine whether a potential mate is from a different species.
Sensing Calories Without Taste
Sensing Calories Without Taste
Francie Diep | Apr 22, 2013
Rodents and fruit flies appear to be able to sense nutrients even when they can’t taste the food they’re eating. Now, researchers are trying to figure out how.
The Sound of Salt
The Sound of Salt
Sabrina Richards | Jan 30, 2013
A putative ion channel integral to mammalian hearing turns out to be an elusive salt-sensing chemoreceptor in nematode worms.
Sweet and Sour Science
Ruth Williams | Feb 1, 2012
Japanese researchers unravel the mystery of miracle fruit.
Taste in the Mouth, Gut, and Airways
Taste in the Mouth, Gut, and Airways
Thomas E. Finger and Sue C. Kinnamon | Dec 1, 2011
The tongue may be the epicenter of taste sensation, but taste receptors are scattered throughout the digestive and respiratory tracts.
Matters of Taste
Thomas E. Finger and Sue C. Kinnamon | Dec 1, 2011
Compounds we perceive as sweet or bitter in the mouth trigger similar receptors and signaling pathways elsewhere in the body, helping to regulate digestion, respiration, and other systems.