Thomas Lovejoy wearing glasses, smiling at camera
“Godfather of Biodiversity” Thomas Lovejoy Dies at 80
The famous ecologist was a lifelong champion for conservation.
“Godfather of Biodiversity” Thomas Lovejoy Dies at 80
“Godfather of Biodiversity” Thomas Lovejoy Dies at 80

The famous ecologist was a lifelong champion for conservation.

The famous ecologist was a lifelong champion for conservation.

ABOVE: Alexis Glenn/George Mason University
ecology & environment
man sitting outdoors
E.O. Wilson, Renowned Ant Researcher, Dies at 92
Chloe Tenn | Dec 27, 2021
The naturalist was recognized for his work on social behavior and pheromones in ants and as a champion of wildlife conservation.
snake eating another snake
Male Snakes Cannibalizing Females Present Evolutionary Puzzle
Chloe Tenn | Nov 15, 2021
The Scientist speaks with organismal biologist Xavier Glaudas about possible reasons for his recent finding that male Montpellier snakes cannibalize female conspecifics.
Illustration showing how seagull chicks know when predators are lurking
Infographic: Animal Embryos Coopt Sound to Survive and Thrive
Amanda Heidt | Nov 1, 2021
Across the tree of life, animals use sound and other vibrations to glean valuable sensory information about their environments even before they are born.
Conceptual image of an embryo with sound waves
Embryonic Eavesdropping: How Animals Hear and Respond to Sound
Amanda Heidt | Nov 1, 2021
Recent findings buck the traditional idea that embryos are passive agents and instead suggest that by tuning into vibrations, organisms can better prepare to enter the outside world.
A smiling Black man leans against a colorful wall
Shane Campbell-Staton Dissects the Anthropocene
Lisa Winter | Sep 1, 2021
The Princeton University evolutionary biologist studies how animals are changing due to human activity.
Five morphs of Poecilia parae—from top: melanzona yellow, melanzona blue, melanzona red, parae, immaculata—and a female (bottom) of the same species
Fish Species’ Y Chromosomes Diverged Even Without Recombination
Catherine Offord | Sep 1, 2021
Researchers discover surprisingly high levels of genetic diversity among the colorful male morphs of a freshwater fish.
With Video
An Australian water beetle walks on the underside of the water's surface.
Australian Beetles Walk on the Underside of Water’s Surface
Lisa Winter | Jul 15, 2021
Watch one scurry around upside down in a remarkably unusual form of locomotion.
Three researchers with headlamps on stand around a loggerhead turtle on the beach while a man covers the turtle's face with a gloved hand
Tiny Hitchhikers Reveal Turtles’ Movements and Foraging Ecology
Amanda Heidt | Jul 13, 2021
Microscopic creatures called epibionts that live on sea turtles’ shells can help researchers understand their secretive lives.
A puma walking through the woods at night
Pandemic Lockdown Eases Mountain Lions’ Fear of Urban Areas
Jef Akst | Jul 2, 2021
Six GPS-tracked wild cats wandered closer to Santa Cruz, California, and surrounding towns as human activity died down under shelter-in-place orders last March.
corals in water with fish
First Immortal Cell Line Cultured for Reef-Building Corals
Amanda Heidt | Jul 1, 2021
Lab-grown cells from the reef-building coral Acropora tenuis provide new opportunities to study bleaching, symbioses, and biomineralization.
An illustration of green bacteria floating above neutral-colored intestinal villi
The Inside Guide: The Gut Microbiome’s Role in Host Evolution
Catherine Offord | Jul 1, 2021
Bacteria that live in the digestive tracts of animals may influence the adaptive trajectories of their hosts.
Adriana L. Romero-Olivares kneels in the lab next to dry mushrooms in oven.
Adriana L. Romero-Olivares Tracks Fungi’s Response to Climate Change
Amanda Heidt | Jun 1, 2021
The New Mexico State University soil microbiologist uses molecular tools to understand how fungi are adapting to a warming world and what that might mean for global nutrient cycles.
Two researchers take samples from salmon using dissecting tools and small sample collection tubes.
Farmed Atlantic Salmon Likely Passed Virus to Wild Pacific Salmon
Abby Olena | May 27, 2021
New genomic analyses reveal that piscine orthoreovirus first came to the Pacific in 1989, around the same time that salmon farms in the area started importing Atlantic salmon eggs from Europe.
A gray wolf runs along a road on a dreary day with pine trees in the distance
Few Car Crashes with Deer in Wisconsin, Perhaps Thanks to Wolves
Jef Akst | May 25, 2021
In areas where gray wolf populations have grown, motorists have fewer collisions with deer, likely due to the predators keeping deer away from roadways.
David Wake is facing the camera, smiling.
Salamander Expert David Wake Dies at 84
Lisa Winter | May 21, 2021
Throughout his career, the University of California, Berkeley, herpetologist named 144 species of salamanders.
Close-up shot of smooth cauliflower polyps
Comprehensive Atlas of Reef-Building Coral’s Cells Created
Christie Wilcox | May 13, 2021
Single-cell RNA sequencing helps to catalog the dozens of cell types present in a stony coral, including its elusive immune cells.
A tiger shark swimming in the shallow water of the ocean above a sandy bottom, with another shark and fish in the background
While Some Sharks Flee, Tiger Sharks Brave Stormy Seas
Nikk Ogasa | May 12, 2021
For the first time, scientists tracked large shark movements during hurricanes and found that tiger sharks may find the turmoil opportunistic for feeding.
An Oxitec mosquito release box from the Florida Keys Friendly Mosquito Project
First US Field Test of GM Mosquitoes Begins in Florida
Christie Wilcox | May 4, 2021
After years of push back, the first batch of Oxitec’s engineered mosquitoes, designed to reduce population numbers, have been released in the Keys.
a large, mossy cedar tree in a forest
Book Excerpt from Finding the Mother Tree
Suzanne Simard | May 1, 2021
In the book’s introduction, “Connections,” Suzanne Simard relates how her “perception of the woods has been turned upside down.”