Bee Reports over the Past Century Indicate a Loss of Diversity
Bee Reports over the Past Century Indicate a Loss of Diversity
An analysis of museum data and naturalists' observations finds that the number of bee species recorded has been declining since the 1990s. The first global, long-term study of bee trends adds to mounting evidence that the pollinators are in trouble worldwide.
Bee Reports over the Past Century Indicate a Loss of Diversity
Bee Reports over the Past Century Indicate a Loss of Diversity

An analysis of museum data and naturalists' observations finds that the number of bee species recorded has been declining since the 1990s. The first global, long-term study of bee trends adds to mounting evidence that the pollinators are in trouble worldwide.

An analysis of museum data and naturalists' observations finds that the number of bee species recorded has been declining since the 1990s. The first global, long-term study of bee trends adds to mounting evidence that the pollinators are in trouble worldwide.

ecology & environment
Q&A: Global Insect Declines Due to “Death by a Thousand Cuts”
Q&A: Global Insect Declines Due to “Death by a Thousand Cuts”
Asher Jones | Jan 15, 2021
University of Connecticut entomologist David Wagner speaks with The Scientist about his biggest concerns for global insect populations and recommendations for actions to help save these tiny but important creatures.
US Confirms World’s First SARS-CoV-2 Cases in Gorillas
US Confirms World’s First SARS-CoV-2 Cases in Gorillas
Max Kozlov | Jan 12, 2021
Zoo officials say the captive primates are recovering, but scientists worry the virus could spread quickly through dwindling wild populations.
EPA Finalizes Much-Criticized “Transparency” Rule
EPA Finalizes Much-Criticized “Transparency” Rule
Shawna Williams | Jan 5, 2021
The regulation, which requires that the agency give preference to dose-response studies in which the underlying data are available, could downplay findings key to defining the dangers of pollution.
Tardigrades’ List of Super Powers Grows Ever Longer
Tardigrades’ List of Super Powers Grows Ever Longer
Ashley Yeager | Jan 1, 2021
Water bears can survive extreme temperatures, oxidative stress, UV radiation, and more, but as work in climate change biology shows, they’re not invulnerable to everything.
Honeybee Microbes Shape the Colony’s Social Behavior
Honeybee Microbes Shape the Colony’s Social Behavior
Max Kozlov | Jan 1, 2021
Recent research shows that the insect’s microbial community is central to protecting the hive from invaders—both big and small.
Celine Frere Chases Dragons and Koalas to Learn How They Adapt
Celine Frere Chases Dragons and Koalas to Learn How They Adapt
Max Kozlov | Jan 1, 2021
The biologist at the University of Sunshine Coast in Australia wants to understand why some animal species adapt well to urbanization, while others fall flat.
2020 in Pictures
2020 in Pictures
Amanda Heidt | Dec 18, 2020
This year yielded stunning images of transparent human organs, apex predators, and the world’s response to the ongoing pandemic.
What’s Killing Killer Whales? Autopsies Reveal a Role for Humans
What’s Killing Killer Whales? Autopsies Reveal a Role for Humans
Ashley Yeager | Dec 16, 2020
Stephen Raverty of the Ministry of Agriculture in Canada and Joseph Gaydos of UC Davis speak with The Scientist about their recent study assessing the causes of orca deaths.
Editor&rsquo;s Picks of <em>The Scientist</em>&rsquo;s Best Infographics of 2020
Editor’s Picks of The Scientist’s Best Infographics of 2020
Jef Akst | Dec 15, 2020
This year’s most captivating illustrations tell stories from the micro scale—such as newborn neurons in the adult brain and bacteria in the infant gut—to the scale of entire ecosystems, including reintroduced predators and rising seas.