Two women wearing plastic gloves hold up hand-sized air-capture devices in a wooded area.
Scientists ID Dozens of Plants, Animals from Free-Floating DNA
In a trio of studies, researchers report capturing and analyzing airborne environmental DNA from a wide variety of plants and animals, suggesting a new way of monitoring which terrestrial species are present in an area.
ABOVE: CHRISTIAN BENDIX
Scientists ID Dozens of Plants, Animals from Free-Floating DNA
Scientists ID Dozens of Plants, Animals from Free-Floating DNA

In a trio of studies, researchers report capturing and analyzing airborne environmental DNA from a wide variety of plants and animals, suggesting a new way of monitoring which terrestrial species are present in an area.

In a trio of studies, researchers report capturing and analyzing airborne environmental DNA from a wide variety of plants and animals, suggesting a new way of monitoring which terrestrial species are present in an area.

ABOVE: CHRISTIAN BENDIX

eDNA

5 images related to stories highlighted in the article, including DNA strand, insect, and dog
Our Favorite Genetics Stories of 2021
Christie Wilcox | Dec 23, 2021
Studies The Scientist covered this year illustrate the expanding importance of genetic and genomic research in all aspects of life science, from ecology to medicine.
A ship off the coast of Antarctica approaches a beach
Q&A: How to Keep Antarctica Safe from Invasive Species
Dan Robitzski | Nov 23, 2021
The Scientist spoke with University of Wollongong ecologist Dana Bergstrom about protecting the continent’s native plants and animals in the face of climate change and a growing human presence.
Environmental DNA Sequencing: Lessons from Ancient and Modern Environments
The Scientist Creative Services Team | Jul 10, 2020
In this webinar, Eske Willerslev and Simon Creer will discuss the discoveries they have made about the ancient and modern world through environmental DNA sequencing.
mole rat, environmental DNA, eDNA, airborne DNA, Techniques, Ecology & Environment, biomonitoring, field monitoring, mammals, genetics & genomics
Environmental DNA Can Be Pulled from the Air
Amanda Heidt | Apr 7, 2021
A proof-of-concept study uses eDNA in the air to detect mammals, expanding the technique beyond aquatic sampling.
water vole edna dna barcode sampling scotland environment ecology conservation
Researchers Detect Land Animals Using DNA in Nearby Water Bodies
Nayanah Siva | Apr 27, 2020
Monitoring the comings and goings of aquatic life with traces of DNA in water has become an established biomonitoring technique, but scientists are now using environmental DNA to assess terrestrial animals.
Researchers Track Sharks and Whales Using DNA in Seawater Samples
Jef Akst | Jan 1, 2019
In addition to detecting unseen organisms in the ocean, studies of environmental DNA can shed light on the genetic structure of marine populations.
Opinion: How We Found a New Way to Detect “Hidden Sharks”
Judith Bakker, Stefano Mariani | May 7, 2018
Given the speed and efficiency of environmental (eDNA) sampling, a much larger portion of the sea can be screened, in a shorter time, for patterns of diversity.
Recreating Fish Migration Written Through Environmental Genomics
Aggie Mika | Jul 16, 2017
Scientists examine floating traces of DNA left by fish to better understand New York’s aquatic life.
No Place to Hide
Claire Asher | May 31, 2017
Environmental DNA is tracking down difficult-to-detect species, from rock snot in the U.S. to cave salamanders in Croatia.