early giraffe relative at the bottom and modern giraffes at top
“Necks for Sex” May Explain Giraffes’ Distinctive Anatomy 
An analysis of skull and vertebrae fossils suggests that an early relative of giraffes butted heads to compete for mates, which may reveal why modern giraffes are so throaty.
“Necks for Sex” May Explain Giraffes’ Distinctive Anatomy 
“Necks for Sex” May Explain Giraffes’ Distinctive Anatomy 

An analysis of skull and vertebrae fossils suggests that an early relative of giraffes butted heads to compete for mates, which may reveal why modern giraffes are so throaty.

An analysis of skull and vertebrae fossils suggests that an early relative of giraffes butted heads to compete for mates, which may reveal why modern giraffes are so throaty.

fighting
Image of the Day: Fight Club
Carolyn Wilke | Jan 11, 2019
South American hummingbird males were caught on camera poking and pinching each other with bills adapted for fighting.
Image of the Day: Cantankerous Crab
The Scientist Staff | May 5, 2017
Hermit crabs living in broken shells outperform those inhabiting intact shells in fights because they attack more aggressively, compensating for lower muscle strength with vigor.
Faces for Fighting?
Jef Akst | Jun 10, 2014
Scientists propose that hominin facial bones evolved for protection against the powerful blows of combat.