A top-down view of bowls filled various high-fiber foods such as rice, corn, seeds, and cereal sitting on a wooden table.
Different Dietary Fibers Affect the Body in Unique Ways
Acting through the microbiome, the fiber arabinoxylan reduces cholesterol in many people, while another fiber, called long-chain inulin, increases inflammation, a study finds.
ABOVE: © ISTOCK.COM, FCAFOTODIGITAL
Different Dietary Fibers Affect the Body in Unique Ways
Different Dietary Fibers Affect the Body in Unique Ways

Acting through the microbiome, the fiber arabinoxylan reduces cholesterol in many people, while another fiber, called long-chain inulin, increases inflammation, a study finds.

Acting through the microbiome, the fiber arabinoxylan reduces cholesterol in many people, while another fiber, called long-chain inulin, increases inflammation, a study finds.

ABOVE: © ISTOCK.COM, FCAFOTODIGITAL

food

Photo of lab-grown chicken from Eat Just, Inc.
Cultured Meat Advances Toward the Market
Abby Olena | Feb 14, 2022
The biotech industry is chipping away at the obstacles standing between the lab and the dinner plate.
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Tuna Story Exposes Challenges of Seafood Authentication
Christie Wilcox | Jul 1, 2021
A New York Times investigation’s failure to amplify tuna DNA from Subway’s tuna salad sandwiches likely says more about the complexities of identifying processed fish than about the ingredients.
Humans Domesticated Yeast Through Bread-Making: Study
Max Kozlov | Dec 11, 2020
Over centuries of cultivating Saccharomyces cerevisiae to make dough, bakers have put selective pressure on the species, causing it to diverge into two distinct groups, according to the authors.
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Wheat Blast Arrives in Zambia, First Time in Africa
Munyaradzi Makoni | Oct 19, 2020
Experts fear the fungal pathogen will spread to other African countries, threatening wheat production.
Image of the Day: Helpful Birds
Emily Makowski | Jan 10, 2020
Parrots aid each other in getting food from a researcher.
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Yellow Dye in Turmeric Linked with Lead Poisoning in Bangladesh
Claire Jarvis | Dec 17, 2019
Scientists track the spice from the soil to the market to pinpoint the source of contamination in pregnant women’s blood.
Exercising Before Eating Burns More Fat: Study
Emily Makowski | Nov 27, 2019
Men had better fat-burning results when they had breakfast after cycling instead of beforehand.
An aerial view of a harvester in a cotton field
The Long Road to Edible Cottonseed
Shawna Williams | Oct 11, 2019
The FDA recently cleared the way for marketing of the genetically modified product. Texas A&M’s Keerti Rathore speaks with The Scientist about why and how it was developed.
egyptian bread and beer making vessels
Image of the Day: Baked with Ancient Yeast
Nicoletta Lanese | Aug 22, 2019
Scientists extracted 4,500-year-old yeast from Egyptian pottery to use in breadmaking.
ancient ring cereal clay archaeology dig site Austria grains circular
Image of the Day: Stale Cereal
Chia-Yi Hou | Jun 10, 2019
Archaeologists find ring-shaped objects made from grains at a site in Austria thought to date back to 960 BCE.
Softer Diets Allowed Early Humans to Pronounce “F,” “V” Sounds
Katarina Zimmer | Mar 14, 2019
Drastic dietary changes during the agricultural revolution altered the configuration of the human bite, paving the way for new sounds in spoken language, a new study finds.
Gene-Edited Soybean Oil Makes Restaurant Debut
Carolyn Wilke | Mar 13, 2019
A Minnesota-based company reports the sale of a soybean oil engineered to have greater stability and no trans-fat.
Doubts Raised About Brain Stimulation to Reduce Food Cravings
Abby Olena | Jan 10, 2019
Despite previous positive reports, researchers didn’t see transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) cut back on people’s urges or eating.
Genetically Engineered Tobacco Does Photosynthesis More Efficiently
Carolyn Wilke | Jan 4, 2019
The modification beefed up plant biomass by 40 percent in field tests.
Cheese Helped Fuel Early Farmers in Europe
Shawna Williams | Dec 1, 2018
Scientists have found traces of the dairy product in 7,200-year-old pottery in Croatia.
Just the Sight of Food Gets the Liver Ready for Action
Abby Olena | Nov 15, 2018
In mice, seeing and smelling food causes immediate cellular changes that ready the liver to convert incoming amino acids to proteins.
USDA Approves Edible Cotton
Jef Akst | Oct 29, 2018
While farmers have the green light to grow the genetically engineered plant, FDA approval is still needed before the seeds are sold as food.
cans of food, seen from the top
A Landmark Study On BPA Leaves Scientists at Odds
Shawna Williams | Oct 26, 2018
Conceived as a way to resolve differences between government regulators and academics over the chemical’s effects, the CLARITY-BPA collaboration instead highlights divisions.
Deadly Swine Disease Spreads Among Pigs in China
Ashley P. Taylor | Oct 25, 2018
Tens of thousands of hogs are being slaughtered to stop its spread.