Two chimps, one grooming the other on the chin
Chimps Appear to Treat Others' Wounds Using Insects
The practice, which hasn’t been previously observed among nonhuman animals, may be a display of empathy. 
Chimps Appear to Treat Others' Wounds Using Insects
Chimps Appear to Treat Others' Wounds Using Insects

The practice, which hasn’t been previously observed among nonhuman animals, may be a display of empathy. 

The practice, which hasn’t been previously observed among nonhuman animals, may be a display of empathy. 

ABOVE: Tobias Deschner
grooming
Image of the Day: Hair Brush
Catherine Offord | Nov 20, 2018
Cats’ tongues are covered in tiny spines called papillae, which help wick moisture from the mouth and onto the fur.
Grooming Baboons
The Scientist Staff | May 31, 2015
See the social interaction between wild baboons that may be the key to shared microbiomes among groups studied by the Amboseli Baboon Research Project.