Artist’s rendition of bright blue microbes among intestinal lining
Study Links Depression with High Levels of an Amino Acid
Experiments in animals and observations in humans suggest that the amount of proline circulating in one’s plasma has a strong association with depression severity.
Study Links Depression with High Levels of an Amino Acid
Study Links Depression with High Levels of an Amino Acid

Experiments in animals and observations in humans suggest that the amount of proline circulating in one’s plasma has a strong association with depression severity.

Experiments in animals and observations in humans suggest that the amount of proline circulating in one’s plasma has a strong association with depression severity.

gut-brain axis
An abstract stained-glass portrait of a woman with an image of an eye representing the brain
Through the Looking Glass: Aging, Inflammation, and Gut Rejuvenation
Iris Kulbatski, PhD | Aug 8, 2022
Renewing the aging gut microbiome holds promise for preventing inflammatory brain and eye degeneration.
A person holding a section of his face and looking in to his brain through a magnifying glass stock illustration
Science Philosophy in a Flash - A Look at Aging Through Young Eyes 
Iris Kulbatski, PhD | Aug 8, 2022
Aimée Parker shares how her childlike curiosity and collaborative spirit motivate her scientific pursuits.
A white lab mouse peers over the wall of a sprawling maze
Bacterial Metabolite May Regulate Cognition in Mice
Sophie Fessl | Jun 3, 2022
Microbes in the gut influence the death of support cells in the brain by producing isoamylamine, a study suggests.
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Revealing Neuronal Influencers Among the Gut Microbiome
The Scientist Creative Services Team | Mar 2, 2022
In this webinar, Sarkis Mazmanian and Daniel Mucida highlight how intestinal bacteria influence neuronal function and regeneration.
illustration of neurons in blue with synapses lighting up
Gut Molecule Linked to Decreased Myelination in Mouse Brains
Angie Voyles Askham, Spectrum | Feb 17, 2022
A study shows that a molecule produced by intestinal microbes can enter the brain and that its presence is also associated with altered brain connectivity.
Illustration of gray bacteriophages approaching and infecting a red and orange bacteria that has multiple fimbria protruding from it.
Bacteria-Infecting Viruses in Gut Microbiome Linked to Cognition
Dan Robitzski | Feb 16, 2022
Research in mice and flies suggests that bacteriophages, including those found in dairy foods, may have an influence on an animals’ ability to learn and remember information.
Variety of sweeteners - Stevia, sugar, pollen and honey stock photo
How the Gut Differentiates Artificial Sweeteners from Sugars
Chloe Tenn | Jan 21, 2022
Signals from sweeteners and sugars are relayed from the gut to the brain by different neural pathways, a new study concludes.
white mouse running on a light blue wheel
Tinkering with Gut Microbes Boosts Brain Plasticity in Mice
Sophie Fessl | Jan 13, 2022
Intestinal bacteria contribute to the effect of stimulating environments on the brain’s ability to adapt, a study concludes.
Artist's impression of the human microbiome
Diet Implicated in Autism-Microbiome Link
Ruth Williams | Nov 11, 2021
The unbalanced gut flora present in some people with autism is not a driver of the condition but rather a consequence of eating behaviors characteristic of the condition, a new study claims.
Exercise Changes Our Gut Microbes, But How Isn’t Yet Clear
Ashley Yeager | Aug 15, 2019
Physical activity, independent of diet, shifts the composition of bacteria in the intestines, spurring researchers to search for species that might provide benefits akin to working out.
Gut Microbes May Play a Role in Mental Health Disorders
Ashley Yeager | Jul 5, 2019
The gut microbiome has been linked to depression, schizophrenia, and other neurological conditions, but it’s not yet clear whether the relationship is causal.
ted dawson alpha-synuclein parkinson's disease model gut vagus nerve dopamine johns hopkins school of medicine
Mouse Model Shows How Parkinson’s Disease Begins in the Gut
Emma Yasinski | Jun 26, 2019
Johns Hopkins’s Ted Dawson discusses his lab’s demonstration that misfolded α-synuclein can move from the stomach to the brain and cause physical and cognitive symptoms.
The Gut of Mice Communicates with the Brain Through the Vagus Nerve
Sukanya Charuchandra | Sep 21, 2018
The researchers who made the discovery suggest the signaling may form a sixth sense.
Opinion: Microbial Mind Control—Truth or Scare?
Katerina Johnson | May 1, 2018
Normal brain function may have evolved to depend on gut microbes and their metabolites.