a trench with footprints tagged with cards
Ancient Human Footprints in New Mexico Dated to Ice Age
Researchers excavated human footprints out of a small bluff next to a dried-up playa lake and radiocarbon-dated embedded seeds to around 23,000 years ago. Their results suggest that people entered the Americas thousands of years earlier than the accepted estimate.
ABOVE: NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, USGS, AND BOURNEMOUTH UNIVERSITY
Ancient Human Footprints in New Mexico Dated to Ice Age
Ancient Human Footprints in New Mexico Dated to Ice Age

Researchers excavated human footprints out of a small bluff next to a dried-up playa lake and radiocarbon-dated embedded seeds to around 23,000 years ago. Their results suggest that people entered the Americas thousands of years earlier than the accepted estimate.

Researchers excavated human footprints out of a small bluff next to a dried-up playa lake and radiocarbon-dated embedded seeds to around 23,000 years ago. Their results suggest that people entered the Americas thousands of years earlier than the accepted estimate.

ABOVE: NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, USGS, AND BOURNEMOUTH UNIVERSITY
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