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When the sexually reproducing grasshopper species Warramaba whitei (left) and Warramaba flavolineata (right) mated around 250,000 years ago, they made Warramaba virgo (center), which has been cloning itself ever since.
How a Grasshopper Gave Up Sex, Took Up Cloning
Meet the grasshopper that has reproduced asexually for a quarter of a million years—without acquiring undue numbers of harmful mutations.
How a Grasshopper Gave Up Sex, Took Up Cloning
How a Grasshopper Gave Up Sex, Took Up Cloning

Meet the grasshopper that has reproduced asexually for a quarter of a million years—without acquiring undue numbers of harmful mutations.

Meet the grasshopper that has reproduced asexually for a quarter of a million years—without acquiring undue numbers of harmful mutations.

hybrid sterility
Burgers and Flies
Megan Scudellari | May 1, 2012 | 9 min read
Inspired by Darwin, Mohamed Noor has uncovered the molecular dance by which a single species becomes two.
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