Illustration of a red bacteriophage infecting a blue bacterium, with other bacteria in the background.
Prokaryotes Are Capable of Learning to Recognize Phages
Immune defense genes in bacteria and archaea can identify viral proteins, a study finds, revealing similarities between the immune systems of prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms.
Prokaryotes Are Capable of Learning to Recognize Phages
Prokaryotes Are Capable of Learning to Recognize Phages

Immune defense genes in bacteria and archaea can identify viral proteins, a study finds, revealing similarities between the immune systems of prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms.

Immune defense genes in bacteria and archaea can identify viral proteins, a study finds, revealing similarities between the immune systems of prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms.

immune signals
Segmented filamentous bacteria artificially colored in green attach to the intestinal wall of a mouse
Gut Microbes Help Coordinate Immune Activity in Mice
Catherine Offord | Jul 29, 2021
The microbiota helps align a mouse’s innate immune system with its feeding patterns, prepping the animal to fend off infection when it’s most likely to be eating.
Drawing of the three kinds of glycosylated cell surface biomolecules: glycoproteins, glycolipids, and now, glycoRNAs
Newly Discovered Glycosylated RNA Is All Over Cells: Study
Christie Wilcox | May 18, 2021
Prior to a 2019 preprint, “glycoRNAs” weren’t known to exist. Now, the researchers who found them say they’re on lots of cells and may play a role in immune signaling.
T Cells and Neurons Talk to Each Other
Ashley Yeager | Oct 1, 2020
Conversations between the immune and central nervous systems are proving to be essential for the healthy social behavior, learning, and memory.
Infographic: How Cytokines Flow into and out of the Brain
Ashley Yeager | Oct 1, 2020
Several routes exist for immune cells to communicate with neurons in the central nervous system, though T cells rarely come in direct contact with neural tissue.
Image of the Day: Smell You Later  
The Scientist Staff | Sep 5, 2017
Scientists demonstrate that just the right amount of inflammation after an injury to a mouse’s olfactory epithelium is key for regenerating cells important for smell.