illustration of a mitochondrian inside a cell
Could Dad’s Mitochondrial DNA Benefit Hybrids?
Studies have found that organisms can inherit mitochondria from male parents in rare instances, and both theoretical and experimental work hint that this biparental inheritance is more than just a fluke.
ABOVE: © ISTOCK.COM, JIAN FAN
Could Dad’s Mitochondrial DNA Benefit Hybrids?
Could Dad’s Mitochondrial DNA Benefit Hybrids?

Studies have found that organisms can inherit mitochondria from male parents in rare instances, and both theoretical and experimental work hint that this biparental inheritance is more than just a fluke.

Studies have found that organisms can inherit mitochondria from male parents in rare instances, and both theoretical and experimental work hint that this biparental inheritance is more than just a fluke.

ABOVE: © ISTOCK.COM, JIAN FAN

interspecies hybrids

stone panel depicting a horselike animal led by ropes around the neck
Ancient Mesopotamians Bred Horselike Hybrids
Chris Baraniuk | Jan 14, 2022
A genomics study reveals the parentage of a long-mysterious creature called a kunga, the earliest-known hybrid animal bred by humans.
Image of the Day: Species-Specific Songs
Emily Makowski | Nov 14, 2019
Gene activity is linked to songbirds’ tunes.

Wolf-like Animal Baffles Montana Scientists
Jim Daley | May 29, 2018
Specialists from the state’s Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks are working to determine what creature a rancher shot and killed.
Monkey Hybrids Challenge Assumptions of What a Species Is
Jim Daley | May 3, 2018
A study finds two species of guenon monkeys in Tanzania have been mating and producing fertile offspring for generations.
Neanderthal-Human Hybrid Unearthed
Bob Grant | Jun 22, 2015
DNA from the 40,000-year-old bones of a modern human found in Europe contains Neanderthal genes.
Ants Climb as Weather Warms
Nsikan Akpan | Mar 26, 2013
Rising temperatures allow one mountain ant to climb higher, displacing a related species and possibly upsetting plant ecology.
(Re)Programming Director
Karen Hopkin | Oct 1, 2012
Unwilling to accept the finality of terminal differentiation, Helen Blau has honed techniques that showcase the flexibility of cells to adopt different identities.