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A 3D microscopic image of a heart tissue section with cardiac myocytes and macrophages.
Taking Out the Trash: An Alternative Cellular Disposal Pathway
Researchers reveal that cellular secretion removes defective mitochondria when lysosomes are dysfunctional.
Taking Out the Trash: An Alternative Cellular Disposal Pathway
Taking Out the Trash: An Alternative Cellular Disposal Pathway

Researchers reveal that cellular secretion removes defective mitochondria when lysosomes are dysfunctional.

Researchers reveal that cellular secretion removes defective mitochondria when lysosomes are dysfunctional.

macrophages

Macrophages on the Fast Track to Tumor Defense
Laura Tran, PhD | Feb 22, 2024 | 3 min read
In a race to the tumor, a macrophage’s phenotype can give it a leg up on the competition.
Orange rod-shaped bacteria over a red and purple background.
Macrophages Curtail Tuberculosis
Danielle Gerhard, PhD | Nov 1, 2023 | 2 min read
Two autophagy genes work together to stop Mycobacterium tuberculosis dead in its tracks.
The adaptive and innate immune responses collaborate to attack T-cell resistant cancer cells
LabTalk Podcast - Phagocidal Macrophages: A New Battle Tactic Against Resistant Cancers
The Scientist and 10x Genomics | 1 min read
The adaptive and innate immune responses collaborate to attack T-cell resistant cancer cells.
Artistic rendering of a cancer cell in red with round, blue accents
Targeting Breast Cancer Metastasis
Tanvir Khan, PhD | Oct 16, 2023 | 3 min read
Researchers inhibited molecules that regulate both tumor and immune cell migration and their crosstalk signaling to impede metastasis.
Close-up image of fat cells
A Snapshot of How Obesity Transforms Fat
Aparna Nathan, PhD | Oct 5, 2023 | 3 min read
Spatial methods reveal immune cell formations in fat during early obesity.
The Scientist's LabTalk Podcast - Episode 1
The Scientist | 1 min read
Myeloid Cells in Cancer and Science Advocacy: A Conversation with Dr. Miriam Merad
three black mice lined up next to each other. the one on the left, fed a low-fat diet, has one small bald patch, the middle mouse, fed fish oil, has a large bald spot across its shoulders and back, and the right mouse, fed cocoa butter, has no baldness.
Fish Oil in Diet Can Cause Hair Loss in Mice, Study Finds
Katherine Irving | Jan 19, 2023 | 3 min read
The oil’s omega-3 fatty acids accumulate in the mice’s skin, triggering an immune response that causes hair loss.
Cross section of an organic cell with intracellular organelles
How Intracellular Bacteria Hijack Your Cells
Catherine Offord | Dec 1, 2022 | 10+ min read
Scientists studying pathogens such as Chlamydia, Legionella, and Listeria get a master class in how to control the internal workings of mammalian cells.
Illustration showing how some intracellular bacteria, such as <em >Legionella pneumophila</em>, manipulate the cell&#39;s membranes for their own good
Infographic: Intracellular Bacteria’s Tricks for Host Manipulation 
Catherine Offord | Dec 1, 2022 | 2 min read
Various microbes, including several human pathogens, hijack the cell’s skeleton, membranes, and protein-making machinery to make themselves at home.
two glowing neuronlike macrophages
Immune Cells Imitating Neurons Cause Pain in Mice with Tumors
Shafaq Zia | Oct 18, 2022 | 3 min read
Whether the finding of a novel mechanism for cancer-related pain can lead to better treatments for neuropathic pain in people remains to be seen.
Erika More developed a jello-like tissue system to study how immune cells stimulate tissues and blood vessel growth.
An Engineer’s Perspective on Autoimmunity
Aparna Nathan, PhD | Dec 10, 2021 | 4 min read
Erika Moore builds biomaterials to study disparate lupus outcomes.
Colorized scanning electron micrograph of Salmonella bacteria in intestinal tissue
Gut Infections Help Shield Intestinal Neurons from Future Damage
Annie Melchor | Nov 19, 2021 | 4 min read
In mice, a kind of immune memory appears to protect the cells against future harm, a finding that could provide insight into treatments for irritable bowel syndrome and other inflammatory digestive conditions.
An illustration of a woman in bed unable to sleep. The bedside clock reads 2:30. Her brain and heart are glowing.
Infographic: Pathways from Noise to Cardiovascular Damage
Thomas Münzel and Omar Hahad | Jun 1, 2021 | 2 min read
Research in mice and humans points to oxidative stress and inflammation as likely drivers of noise-induced health effects such as hypertension and heart disease.
Clip art of a crane, car, and plane flying over a city outside the window of two people in bed not sleeping, with a starry night background
How Environmental Noise Harms the Cardiovascular System
Thomas Münzel and Omar Hahad | Jun 1, 2021 | 10+ min read
Sound from cars, aircraft, trains, and other man-made machines is more than just annoying. It increases the risk of cardiovascular disease.
neutrobots, neutrophils, white blood cells, microrobots, nanorobots, microbots, glioma, brain cancer, paclitaxel, magnetic, swarm, mice
Microscopic Robots Deliver Drugs to the Brain
Asher Jones | Mar 30, 2021 | 5 min read
Researchers turned white blood cells called neutrophils into drug-smuggling “neutrobots,” which penetrated the blood-brain barrier to treat brain cancer in mice.
CAR Macrophages Tackle Challenges in Solid Cancer Treatment
Amanda Heidt | Mar 26, 2021 | 6 min read
Following on the success of CAR T cells used to treat cancers of the blood, researchers have launched a Phase 1 clinical trial of genetically modified macrophages to target solid tumors.
Many Deep-Sea Microbes Invisible to Mammalian Immune System
Abby Olena, PhD | Mar 12, 2021 | 3 min read
In a new study, human and mouse cells recognized only one in five bacterial species collected from more than a mile below the Pacific Ocean’s surface.
Infographic: Envisioning Macrophages
Ashley Yeager | Mar 1, 2021 | 1 min read
Researchers find different distributions of the immune cells in young, older, and diseased eyes.
Macrophages of the Human Eye Come into Focus
Ashley Yeager | Mar 1, 2021 | 3 min read
Imaged in real time in living people, immune cells at the surface of the retina could serve as biomarkers to detect retinal and possibly neurological diseases and track their progression.
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