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Opinion: The Promise and Plight of Open Data
Open science serves to make the research process more transparent. But we are still waiting to realize the fruits of open-data policies at scientific journals.
Opinion: The Promise and Plight of Open Data
Opinion: The Promise and Plight of Open Data

Open science serves to make the research process more transparent. But we are still waiting to realize the fruits of open-data policies at scientific journals.

Open science serves to make the research process more transparent. But we are still waiting to realize the fruits of open-data policies at scientific journals.

open science
Three luminous liquids in test tubes
What If Scientists Shared Their Reagents for Free?
Amanda Heidt | Jul 18, 2022 | 9 min read
Some researchers have decided to provide their products without financial compensation or expectations of authorship on resulting papers, prompting a flurry of new work.
Photo of Colin Carlson
Colin Carlson Works to Predict and Prevent Viral Spillover
Catherine Offord | Jul 18, 2022 | 3 min read
The Georgetown University biologist studies how climate change contributes to the emergence of new zoonotic threats.
animation of keyboard with key labelled &quot;share&quot;<br><br>
New Initiative Incentivizes Open Research
Andy Carstens | Jun 3, 2022 | 6 min read
A large coalition of colleges and universities aims to change hiring, promotion, and tenure practices to reward collaboration.
Microscope image of Chlamydomonas
Researcher Sanctioned by PNAS for Not Sharing Alga
Catherine Offord | Jun 9, 2021 | 1 min read
Zhangfeng Hu will be unable to submit manuscripts for three years after having violated the journal’s policy about making study materials available to other scientists.
Image of the Day: Beating Heart
Sukanya Charuchandra | Jul 2, 2018 | 1 min read
Scientists at the Allen Institute for Cell Science have developed an open-source stem cell line with fluorescent tags for cardiac cells.
Dutch Universities, Journal Publishers Agree on Open-Access Deals
Diana Kwon | Apr 17, 2018 | 5 min read
Despite some difficult negotiations, academic institutions in the Netherlands have been securing subscriptions that combine publishing and reading into one fee.
Elsevier Signs Up to Transparency Guidelines
Catherine Offord | Sep 5, 2017 | 2 min read
The publisher will ask its journal editors to adopt widely accepted standards on transparency and openness in scientific communication.
European Drug Regulator Releases Clinical Trial Data
Ben Andrew Henry | Oct 21, 2016 | 2 min read
In the initial steps of a campaign to make clinical reports publicly available, the European Medicines Agency has published data on two recently approved drugs.
Even More Preprints
Bob Grant | Aug 17, 2016 | 1 min read
A new psychology-centric preprint server is slated to launch.
Online Platforms to Share Medical Data Launch
Jenny Rood | Apr 1, 2015 | 2 min read
The “Genes for Good” Facebook app and the Open Humans Network plan to recruit large numbers of volunteers for medical studies using social media.
Truly Brief Communications
Dalmeet Singh Chawla | Feb 18, 2015 | 2 min read
The Journal of Brief Ideas, a platform that publishes 200-word articles, launches in beta.
Open Science Evangelist Dies
Rina Shaikh-Lesko | May 30, 2014 | 1 min read
Jean-Claude Bradley, the chemist known as the father of the Open Notebook Science movement, has passed away.
New Center for Scientific Transparency
Dan Cossins | Mar 6, 2013 | 2 min read
Psychologists have launched a new organization to encourage openness and improve the reliability of findings in their own field and beyond.
Uncloaking Clinical Trials
Beth Marie Mole | Oct 16, 2012 | 2 min read
Glaxo­SmithKline will share long-sought, raw trial data—but access will be tightly controlled.  
Sharing Made Easy
Megan Scudellari | Sep 1, 2012 | 7 min read
Biological resource centers are bigger and better than ever before, storing and distributing shared reagents, plasmids, and more.
Arsenic-based Life Challenged Again
Hannah Waters | Jan 24, 2012 | 1 min read
An attempt to regrow the infamous GFAJ-1 bacteria, reported to incorporate arsenic into its DNA backbone, has failed.
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