paleoanthropology
Fossil Teeth Rewrite Human Migration to Asia
Fossil Teeth Rewrite Human Migration to Asia
Bob Grant | Oct 16, 2015
Researchers in China have discovered 47 human teeth and suggest that they are between 80,000 and 120,000 years old—about 30,000 years earlier than Homo sapiens were believed to have made it to Asia.
Ancient African DNA Hints at Eurasian Migration
Ancient African DNA Hints at Eurasian Migration
Bob Grant | Oct 13, 2015
A 4,500-year-old genome, extracted from the skeleton of an Ethiopian man, bears the marks of human migration from Europe back into Africa.
<em>Homo naledi</em>’s Hands and Feet
Homo naledi’s Hands and Feet
Bob Grant | Oct 6, 2015
Two new analyses of fossil remains from the recently discovered human relative suggest the species may have been uniquely adapted to both terrestrial and arboreal locomotion.
The First Americans
The First Americans
Bob Grant | Jul 23, 2015
Two genetic studies seeking to determine how people first migrated to North and South America yield different results.
Our Primitive Hands
Our Primitive Hands
Bob Grant | Jul 15, 2015
New research suggests that the form of the human hand has been around for a lot longer than previously thought.
Kennewick Man Was Native American
Kennewick Man Was Native American
Jef Akst | Jun 18, 2015
Genomic analysis suggests that the skeleton’s closest living relatives are Native American after all.
TS Live: Genetic Time Machine
TS Live: Genetic Time Machine
Bob Grant | Jun 12, 2015
Piecing together scraps of DNA from a 400,000-year-old hominin femur
Contributors
Contributors
The Scientist Staff | Jun 1, 2015
Meet some of the people featured in the June 2015 issue of The Scientist.
Book Excerpt from <em>The Strange Case of the Rickety Cossack</em>
Book Excerpt from The Strange Case of the Rickety Cossack
Ian Tattersall | Jun 1, 2015
In the prologue, “Lemurs and the Delights of Fieldwork,” author Ian Tattersall shares the paleoanthropological lessons he learned from studying non-human primates in Madagascar.
What’s Old Is New Again
What’s Old Is New Again
Bob Grant | Jun 1, 2015
Revolutionary new methods for extracting, purifying, and sequencing ever-more-ancient DNA have opened an unprecedented window into the history of life on Earth.