early giraffe relative at the bottom and modern giraffes at top
“Necks for Sex” May Explain Giraffes’ Distinctive Anatomy 
An analysis of skull and vertebrae fossils suggests that an early relative of giraffes butted heads to compete for mates, which may reveal why modern giraffes are so throaty.
“Necks for Sex” May Explain Giraffes’ Distinctive Anatomy 
“Necks for Sex” May Explain Giraffes’ Distinctive Anatomy 

An analysis of skull and vertebrae fossils suggests that an early relative of giraffes butted heads to compete for mates, which may reveal why modern giraffes are so throaty.

An analysis of skull and vertebrae fossils suggests that an early relative of giraffes butted heads to compete for mates, which may reveal why modern giraffes are so throaty.

ruminants
Productivity Paradox
Jim Daley | Jun 1, 2018
During the last ice age, there wasn’t much plant matter to eat on northern steppes, but herbivorous woolly mammoths were abundant. How did they survive?
Giraffe Diplomacy
Chris Tachibana | Feb 1, 2016
Is the public dissection of zoo animals a boon to research and education, a PR nightmare, or both?
Giraffe in Half
The Scientist Staff | Jan 31, 2016
Watch footage from the public dissection of Marius, the young giraffe at the Copenhagen Zoo who was ultimately fed to predators at the facility. (CAUTION: GRAPHIC IMAGES)