ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
Ribbon weed meadow in Shark Bay, Western Australia
World’s Largest Organism Discovered Underwater
Off the western Australian coast, in Shark Bay, a field of seagrass big enough to cover Washington, DC, has flourished for more than four millennia, a new study finds.
World’s Largest Organism Discovered Underwater
World’s Largest Organism Discovered Underwater

Off the western Australian coast, in Shark Bay, a field of seagrass big enough to cover Washington, DC, has flourished for more than four millennia, a new study finds.

Off the western Australian coast, in Shark Bay, a field of seagrass big enough to cover Washington, DC, has flourished for more than four millennia, a new study finds.

seagrass
Natural sunbeams underwater through water surface in the Mediterranean sea on a seabed with neptune grass, Catalonia, Roses, Costa Brava, Spain
Marine Plant Partners with Microbes Like Terrestrial Plants Do
Rachael Moeller Gorman | Mar 14, 2022 | 5 min read
A seagrass relies on symbiotic bacteria inside its roots to fix nitrogen. This is the first time scientists have demonstrated that this relationship occurs in a marine plant.
Infographic showing how a new bacteria species called <em>Candidatus Celerinatantimonas neptuna</em> lives in seagrass and how it provides the plant with nitrogen
Infographic: Nitrogen-Fixing Bacteria Live Inside Seagrass Roots
Rachael Moeller Gorman | Mar 14, 2022 | 1 min read
Researchers can now explain how some marine plants obtain their nitrogen.
Seagrass underwater on a sandy seabed.
Seagrasses Continue to Emit Methane Decades After Death
Alejandra Manjarrez | Feb 22, 2022 | 4 min read
Methane production, likely achieved by a diverse group of methanogenic archaea, occurs at similar rates in both alive and dead seagrasses, a study reports. The findings highlight the potential environmental impact of seagrasses declining globally.
sargassum
Swamped by Sargassum: The New Normal for Caribbean Beaches
Kerry Grens | Jul 15, 2019 | 5 min read
Scientists are pretty sure they know where the seaweed is coming from. Now they want to know why it’s here.
Genome Digest
Catherine Offord | Feb 22, 2016 | 4 min read
What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes
ADVERTISEMENT