skulls
Why Are Modern Humans Relatively Browless?
Why Are Modern Humans Relatively Browless?
Jim Daley | Jul 1, 2018
The function of early hominins’ enlarged brow ridges, and their reduction in size in Homo sapiens, have puzzled paleoanthropologists for decades.
Image of the Day: Ice Age Horse 
Image of the Day: Ice Age Horse 
The Scientist Staff | Nov 29, 2017
Scientists have identified a new genus of extinct horse that lived in North America during the last ice age. 
Image of the Day: No Table Manners
Image of the Day: No Table Manners
The Scientist Staff | Aug 24, 2017
Ancient bones of the newly described toothless, stout-nosed dolphin Inermorostrum xenops suggest that it slurped its food.
When the Neanderthals Disappeared
When the Neanderthals Disappeared
Anna Azvolinsky | Aug 20, 2014
Analysis of 40 European archaeological sites suggests a gradual extinction of Neanderthals over thousands of years.  
Skull Collection Helps Explain Early Neanderthal Evolution
Skull Collection Helps Explain Early Neanderthal Evolution
Anna Azvolinsky | Jun 19, 2014
An examination of 17 ancient skulls shows that some Neanderthal features arose as far back as 430,000 years ago.
A Hole in the Head
A Hole in the Head
Abby Olena | Sep 30, 2013
Scientists show that the position of the foramen magnum, the hole in the skull through which the spine connects to the brain, is correlated with locomotion and posture in mammals.
Gould's bias
Megan Scudellari | Jun 16, 2011
A new study finds that Stephen J. Gould's criticisms of another scientist's data was misplaced, and the eminent biologist and historian succumbed to data bias himself.