Conceptual image of an embryo with sound waves
Embryonic Eavesdropping: How Animals Hear and Respond to Sound
Recent findings buck the traditional idea that embryos are passive agents and instead suggest that by tuning into vibrations, organisms can better prepare to enter the outside world.
ABOVE: COMPOSITE FROM © ISTOCK.COM, GEORGE PERKINS; © ISTOCK.COM, TheCrimsonMonkey
Embryonic Eavesdropping: How Animals Hear and Respond to Sound
Embryonic Eavesdropping: How Animals Hear and Respond to Sound

Recent findings buck the traditional idea that embryos are passive agents and instead suggest that by tuning into vibrations, organisms can better prepare to enter the outside world.

Recent findings buck the traditional idea that embryos are passive agents and instead suggest that by tuning into vibrations, organisms can better prepare to enter the outside world.

ABOVE: COMPOSITE FROM © ISTOCK.COM, GEORGE PERKINS; © ISTOCK.COM, TheCrimsonMonkey
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