Photo of a North American caribou (Rangifer tarandus) in Jasper National Park in Canada
Dozens of Genes Tied to Caribou’s Seasonal Migration
Researchers tracked the movements of endangered caribou and sequenced a portion of their genomes to determine which genes may influence migratory behavior.
ABOVE: Mark Bradley, Parks Canada
Dozens of Genes Tied to Caribou’s Seasonal Migration
Dozens of Genes Tied to Caribou’s Seasonal Migration

Researchers tracked the movements of endangered caribou and sequenced a portion of their genomes to determine which genes may influence migratory behavior.

Researchers tracked the movements of endangered caribou and sequenced a portion of their genomes to determine which genes may influence migratory behavior.

ABOVE: Mark Bradley, Parks Canada

wildlife conservation

A reticulated giraffe in Samburu National Park, Kenya
Whole-Genome Data Point to Four Species of Giraffe
Ruth Williams | May 6, 2021
The genome sequences of 51 giraffes from all over Africa contribute to the latest attempt in an ongoing pursuit to pin down a species number.
Picture of Markus Dyck standing outside, wearing a red coat and ball cap.
Polar Bear Researcher Markus Dyck Dies in Helicopter Crash
Lisa Winter | Apr 30, 2021
Dyck was widely respected for working alongside indigenous groups as he studied polar bears on their ancestral lands.
Slideshow: How Ecologists Study the World’s Apex Predators
Katarina Zimmer | Nov 1, 2020
A global decline of large carnivores has motivated scientists to understand the animals’ ecological roles, and consider whether reintroducing them can help restore ecosystems.
Can Rewilding Large Predators Regenerate Ecosystems?
Katarina Zimmer | Nov 1, 2020
As some conservationists and researchers begin to return large carnivores to areas where they once roamed, scientists intensify efforts to study the ecological roles of predators.
Infographic: How Large Carnivores Sculpt Ecosystems
Katarina Zimmer | Nov 1, 2020
The release of gray wolves in Yellowstone decades ago still stands as one of the few examples of a predator reintroduction, and the lessons learned continue to be debated. New projects aim to do it again.
a Tasmanian devil peaks out of a hollow log
How to Reintroduce a Long-Lost Species
Shawna Williams | Oct 20, 2020
Conservation biologist John Ewen discusses the recent reintroduction of Tasmanian devils to mainland Australia after a 3,000-year absence and issues that need to be considered when bringing long-departed animals back into an area.
Poisoning Suspected in Recent Hooded Vulture Deaths
Amy Schleunes | Mar 11, 2020
Experts warn that an explosion of hooded vulture deaths in Guinea-Bissau could push the critically endangered species to the brink of extinction.
Glowing Amphibians Extremely Common
Lisa Winter | Feb 28, 2020
A study of the animals using blue light reveals what humans are not able to see with the naked eye.
Wild Birds Remember a Novel Task for Nearly Two Years
Amy Schleunes | Feb 18, 2020
A population of North Island robins in a New Zealand sanctuary provides a unique system for investigating the memory skills of birds in the wild.
Conflicts of Interest at Conservation Group IUCN: Investigation
Amy Schleunes | Feb 14, 2020
Buzzfeed uncovers trophy hunters among the ranks of the International Union for Conservation of Nature, which, critics say, may be impeding wildlife protection.
Researchers Fight a Devastating Amphibian Infection Using Heat
Jennifer Parker | Jan 13, 2020
They’ve survived volcanic eruptions, but one Caribbean island’s mountain chicken frogs might need help from scientists to escape the lethal chytrid fungus.
Saving Mountain Chickens
The Scientist Staff | Jan 13, 2020
Peek inside the effort to save this critically endangered Caribbean frog species.
How Interconnected Is Life in the Ocean?
Catherine Offord | Nov 1, 2019
To help create better conservation and management plans, researchers are measuring how marine organisms move between habitats and populations.
Interactive: How Interconnected Is Life in the Ocean?
Catherine Offord | Nov 1, 2019
To help create better conservation and management plans, researchers are measuring how marine organisms move between habitats and populations.
North America Has 3 Billion Fewer Birds Than it Did in 1970
Catherine Offord | Sep 19, 2019
Population reductions in species such as sparrows and blackbirds reflect a concerning pattern of declining biodiversity across the continent, researchers find.
Loa water frog from 2015
Image of the Day: Last Loa Water Frogs
Nicoletta Lanese | Aug 27, 2019
Scientists hope to breed the species in captivity because their habitat has nearly disappeared.
bobcat wildlife camera trap Ohio state university Project Wild Coshocton
Image of the Day: Bobcat Sighting
Chia-Yi Hou | Apr 29, 2019
A camera trap snaps a photo of a wild bobcat in a location new to scientists studying the animals’ geographical range in Ohio.
cat tracking device movement data biomechanics accelerometer wildlife
Image of the Day: Cat Trackers
Chia-Yi Hou | Apr 6, 2019
Researchers in Australia are capturing movement data by fitting cats with accelerometers and sending them outdoors.
Cities Can Serve as Cauldrons of Evolution
Catherine Offord | Jan 1, 2019
From changes in gene flow to adaptation, the effects of urbanization are shaping the evolutionary trajectories of plants and animals.