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NCCCS BioNetwork: Cutting-Edge Workforce Training
NCCCS BioNetwork: Cutting-Edge Workforce Training
NCCCS BioNetworkCutting-Edge Workforce TrainingWhen announcing Novartis' new vaccine-manufacturing facility at Holly Springs, NC, CEO Joerge Reinhardt said, "The fact that we can have instantaneous workers was absolutely essential. It was the main reason why we picked North Carolina." The NC Community College System (NCCCS) BioNetwork is providing that workforce for Novartis and the hundreds of other companies that make North Carolina the number-three biotech state in the United States. NC
COMPANIES SUPPORTING OTHER COMPANIES
COMPANIES SUPPORTING OTHER COMPANIES
By Meredith SmallCOMPANIES SUPPORTING OTHER COMPANIESIn the biotechnology world, service groups pick up crucial aspects from development through sales.Mark WickerJASON VARNEY | VARNEYPHOTO.COM In Greensboro, NC, Mark Wicker runs his own company, Carolina Research Glass, where he produces one-of-a-kind, hand-blown laboratory glass. One of only 600 scientific glass blowers in the country, Wicker works in Pyrex and produces about 500 objects a month. "I make drug- and aerosol-delivery devices, is
On the panda trail
On the panda trail
In our May issue, contributor Jerry Guo traveled to the Wolong Nature Reserve in China's Sichuan Province to learn what researchers there are doing to increase the panda population. Here, see the pandas at play ? and what they leave behind.
WELCOMING BIOTECH WITH OPEN ARMS
WELCOMING BIOTECH WITH OPEN ARMS
By David SchoonmakerWELCOMING BIOTECH WITH OPEN ARMSThrough the North Carolina Biotechnology Center, the Tarheel State encourages industry investment. In 1984, biotechnology was anything but a household word, especially in North Carolina. Nonetheless, a group of Tarheel visionaries saw the future as it might be and set about to make it happen. The North Carolina Biotechnology Center was created that year by the state legislature as the nation's first private, nonprofit organization to further
GROWING TECHNOLOGY IN WINSTON-SALEM
GROWING TECHNOLOGY IN WINSTON-SALEM
By Bill DeanGROWING TECHNOLOGY IN WINSTON-SALEMPeople make up the materials for building a research community. Bill Dean is director of the Piedmont Triad Research Park.JASON VARNEY | VARNEYPHOTO.COM The attraction of employment, higher income, capital investment, and continued economic growth to raise the standards of living drive communities to build a competitive advantage. Communities around the world are building, or rebuilding, to the new-knowled
The North Carolina Biotechnology Center
The North Carolina Biotechnology Center
The North Carolina Biotechnology CenterCatalyzing economic development and job creation across the stateWhen scientists conducted the first successful genetic-engineering experiments in the 1970s, leaders in North Carolina paid attention. They realized that this emerging technology could bring substantial economic and societal benefits. North Carolina seemed particularly well suited for biotechnology because its traditional industries - especially agriculture, food, forestry, and medicine - were
The Catevo Group
The Catevo Group
The Catevo GroupCatalysts for Business EvolutionIn the world of science, a catalyst modifies and increases the rate of a chemical reaction by providing just the right spark at just the right time. In the business world, The Catevo Group strives to do the same - to provide just the right spark at just the right time to increase an organization's ability to achieve business and operational objectives. "Catalysts, by definition, provide energy to cause reactions," explains Catevo President and CEO
TURNING TEAMWORK INTO BIOTECH
TURNING TEAMWORK INTO BIOTECH
By Mike May - Guest EditorTURNING TEAMWORK INTO BIOTECHA decade or two ago, North Carolina was known for few things: tobacco farming, furniture building, and the first flight of the Wright brothers. Most of all, North Carolina held a reputation as the training ground for astounding basketball players, including Grant Hill, Michael Jordan, David Thompson, and many others. The cognoscenti, however, imagined a new status for the state. Even as early as the mid-20th century, teams of academic scient
STATEWIDE SCIENCE
STATEWIDE SCIENCE
STATEWIDE SCIENCE In many respects, the dividing line between academics and industry blurs across many areas of North Carolina. As depicted here, this state provides a home for some of the most powerful research institutions in the world. Much of the academic work, however, leads to new applications, as shown here in the work on stem cells by Anthony Atala of the Wake Forest University School of Medicine's Institute for Regenerative Medicine and the genetic approach to diseases taken by Ol
Slideshow: The whirling fish kill
Slideshow: The whirling fish kill
Slideshow: The whirling fish kill Andrea Gawrylewski visits a western Maryland fishery as workers haul nearly 40,000 pounds of rainbow trout infected with whirling disease out of the raceways. var FO = { movie:"http://www.the-scientist.com/supplementary/flash/53046/fishy.swf", width:"550", height:"450", majorversion:"8", build:"0", xi:"true"}; UFO.create(FO, "ufoDemo"); Please download the Adobe Flash Player to view this content:
TRANSLATING ACADEMICS TO APPLICATIONS
TRANSLATING ACADEMICS TO APPLICATIONS
By Becky OskinTRANSLATING ACADEMICS TO APPLICATIONSToday's basic research transforms tomorrow's medicine and technology.Prenatal ultrasound image of a 12 week gestation fetus during an amniocentesis session. (Image was captured using a GE Voluson 730 Expert Ultrasound with a 3D probe.) Stem cells are more or less the body's blank-canvas cells that can produce virtually any others; they promise huge advances in medicine, perhaps one day even curing spinal injuries and more. There are problems,
A Master Plan for Technological Innovation in North Carolina's Piedmont Triad
A Master Plan for Technological Innovation in North Carolina's Piedmont Triad
A Master Plan for Technological Innovation in North Carolina's Piedmont TriadThe seed of a unique research institution is germinating in Greensboro, NC. The gracious southern city is already home to North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University (N.C. A&T) and The University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG) - each with a rich history that dates back to the 19th century. Now, the two schools have come together in the 21st century with a bold plan to build a joint campus - called
Biosense or Biononsense
Biosense or Biononsense
Biosense or Biononsense? Years of development and hundreds of millions of dollars later, what has the CDC's syndromic surveillance program accomplished?By Katherine Eban ARTICLE EXTRAS Syndromic Surveillance in California It was two days before Thanksgiving 2004, when an epidemiologist in New Jersey's public health agency picked up a heart-stopping electronic message. The
Syndromic Surveillance in California
Syndromic Surveillance in California
Syndromic Surveillance in California One state's less-than-stellar experience tracking disease By Katherine Eban ARTICLE EXTRAS Biosense or Biononsense? As spinach tainted with a deadly Escherichia coli made its way last year from a California farm through 26 states, sickening more than 200 people and killing three, a bill to advance symptom mo
North Carolina State University
North Carolina State University
North Carolina State UniversityIt's lunchtime on the brickyard plaza at North Carolina State University, and the chatter includes impassioned discussions of research and learning. A chemistry professor and a graduate student debate the meaning of their newest data, while a cluster of entomology and genetics students practice French conversation over sandwiches. Budding industrial engineers discuss information extraction from three-dimensional images. Based on the conversations, any passerby
EIGHTY YEARS IN THE MAKING
EIGHTY YEARS IN THE MAKING
By Kendall MorganEIGHTY YEARS IN THE MAKINGThe life of a genetics pioneerOLIVER SMITHIES JASON VARNEY | VARNEYPHOTO.COM As a child in England in the 1930s, Oliver Smithies found his path before he knew that "science" was its name. "I remember, as a six- or seven-year-old, fairly clearly, that I wanted to be an inventor," says Smithies, who is Excellence Professor of Pathology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. "In a sense, that's what I've been ever since. I've invente
THE STATE OF INDUSTRIAL RESEARCH
THE STATE OF INDUSTRIAL RESEARCH
By Mike MayTHE STATE OF INDUSTRIAL RESEARCHNorth Carolina's industry rejuvenates traditional fields and spurs new ones. Harry Hart understands that traditional crops, corn and tobacco, can no longer sustain his family farm. In fields that once lay fallow in the winter, Hart now cultivates the cool-weather canola plant, whose seeds are rich in oil. In his own backyard, Hart extracts the oil and mixes it with methanol and a catalyst in 50-gallon drums to produce a clean-burning biodiesel fuel
Delete
Delete
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INTENTLY FOCUSED
INTENTLY FOCUSED
By David SchoonmakerINTENTLY FOCUSEDDemonstrating the power of combining scientific curiosity with product safety. STEVE PETTEWAYJASON VARNEY | VARNEYPHOTO.COM Stephen R. Petteway, Jr. regularly asks himself, "If I were a patient, what would I want to see in my products?" Unmet patient needs are his primary motivator, and he encourages the same attitude among the roughly 330 scientists, engineers, and technicians he directs at Talecris Biotherapeutics'
TURNING NATURE INTO TECHNOLOGY
TURNING NATURE INTO TECHNOLOGY
By Rachel DickinsonTURNING NATURE INTO TECHNOLOGYNorth Carolina's natural resources could spawn many advanced industries. Red Tide: A massive fish kill caused by toxic harmful algae bloom. Gymnodinium breve algae.© BRIAN DOMBROWSKIIn August 2006, the decade's worst red tide - an algal bloom that can be deadly to fish, turtles, sea mammals, and humans - hit Puget Sound in Washington State and shut down shellfish beds all along the sound. Such blooms have an impact on ocean waters around the w
The Vaccine Conundrum
The Vaccine Conundrum
The Vaccine Conundrum A highly effective strategy is all but ignored by many companies and investors. Why, and what can be done to boost funding?By Dan Zimmerman, Ken S. Rosenthal, and Eyal Talor ARTICLE EXTRASDavid Bloom on why vaccines are a good investment They've eradicated smallpox, and all but eradicated polio. Their successes in lowering the disease burden of any number of other diseases are wel
Why vaccines are a good investment
Why vaccines are a good investment
Why vaccines are a good investment An economist says lower health care costs are just the tip of the icebergBy Melinda Wenner David Bloom ARTICLE EXTRASThe Vaccine Conundrum David Bloom first became interested in international health in the late 1980s. At that time he was an established labor economist, and the economic aspects of the AIDS epid
CAROLINA CROs
CAROLINA CROs
By Charles ChoiCAROLINA CROs Contract research organizations extend the capabilities of biotechnology companies.Fred EshelmanCOURTESY OF PPDIn 1985, Fred Eshelman took a gigantic risk. He left Glaxo, now part of GlaxoSmithKline, where he'd served as senior vice president of development and vice president of clinical operations, to go home - literally. Working in a home office, he started a one-person consulting firm called PPD. This contract research organization (CRO) grew rapidly. Over the y
Spring Books
Spring Books
From stem cells to wild trees and evolution to CSI, a recent crop of books has something to say about scientific conflicts, conquests and controversies. Christopher Thomas Scott reviews a trio of new stem cell books Jennifer Rohn reviews Lynn Margulis' Luminous Fish Brendan Maher examines faith, Darwin, and Intelligent Design Andrea Gawrylewski reviews Richard Preston's The Wild Trees Ne
CALLING IN CROP SCIENCE
CALLING IN CROP SCIENCE
By John V. BoyneCALLING IN CROP SCIENCETop agricultural companies make North Carolina home. John V. Boyne is director of communications at Bayer CropScience. To know why three of the world's top crop-science companies selected North Carolina for their North American headquarters, look at the example of Bayer CropScience. According to Bill Buckner, president and CEO of Bayer CropScience's US operations, "You can't beat North Carolina in terms of loc
THE STATE OF SPINOFFS
THE STATE OF SPINOFFS
By Frank DillerTHE STATE OF SPINOFFSThree different beginnings show the variety of ways to evolve from an idea to a company. In the late 1990s, scientists from R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company published many papers and abstracts about neuronal nicotinic receptors (NNRs). Knowing that such receptors respond to nicotine explains why a tobacco company would study them. Moreover, some research indicates that NNRs could play a role in tobacco's toxic effects. For example, bronchial epithelial cells
The Death of Faith?
The Death of Faith?
The Death of Faith? Darwin's theory was part of a larger cultural shift towards naturalistic philosophy. Why is he still the target of so many attacks?By Brendan Maher ARTICLE EXTRASSPRING BOOKSStem Cells on ShelvesAn Awkward SymbiosisHigh in the TreesBloody IsleThe Enchantment of EnhancementBooks about BodiesNew Lab Man
Books about Bodies
Books about Bodies
Books about Bodies When the fictionalized glamour of forensics science recedes, will the stories still captivate?By Katherine Ramsland ARTICLE EXTRASSPRING BOOKSStem Cells on ShelvesAn Awkward SymbiosisThe Death of Faith?High in the TreesBloody IsleThe Enchantment of EnhancementNew Lab ManualsIn Brief Cause of Death: Forensic Files of a Medical Examiner, By Stephen D. Cohle and Tobin T. Buhk, 32
New Lab Manuals
New Lab Manuals
New Lab Manuals Everything I needed to know about science I learned in Driver's Ed.By Wendy Chao ARTICLE EXTRASSPRING BOOKSStem Cells on ShelvesAn Awkward SymbiosisThe Death of Faith?High in the TreesBloody IsleThe Enchantment of EnhancementBooks about BodiesIn Brief Recombinant DNA: Genes and Genomes - A Short Course, By James D. Watson, A
In Brief
In Brief
In Brief ARTICLE EXTRASSPRING BOOKSStem Cells on ShelvesAn Awkward SymbiosisThe Death of Faith?High in the TreesBloody IsleThe Enchantment of EnhancementBooks about BodiesNew Lab Manuals Galileo's Gout: Science in an Age of Endarkenment, By Gerald Weissmann, 192 pp., Bellevue Literary Press, $25. The first effort for the Bellevue Literary Press is a collection of essays by the rheumatologist and author whose
BIOTECH-TRANSITION TOWNS
BIOTECH-TRANSITION TOWNS
By Catherine Macek BIOTECH-TRANSITION TOWNS Villages can grow into technology giants with the right combination of rural roots and corporate investment. Biotech businesses dot North Carolina's landscape, even turning small towns into biotech villages. Some spots offered the right space at the right time. Others provided proximity to transportation routes. Still others supplied a sweet de
THE STATE OF EDUCATION
THE STATE OF EDUCATION
By Charles Blackburn, JrTHE STATE OF EDUCATIONStarting early and intensely trains tomorrow's creative biotechnologists. "Overall it was just a great learning experience" one young alumnus said of Summer Ventures in Science and Mathematics, a free, state-funded program for academically talented North Carolina students who may pursue careers in science and mathematics. These summer camps are offered at six college campuses across the state. "Rising juniors and seniors come together in resid
SHOW US THE MONEY
SHOW US THE MONEY
By Peter GwynneSHOW US THE MONEYDespite limited sources of capital, would-be entrepreneurs with solid biobusiness ideas can usually obtain financial support.Art PappasJASON VARNEY | VARNEYPHOTO.COMIt might lack the intellectual cachet of life science in Boston-Cambridge and the Bay area, but North Carolina boasts a significant amount of research in biomedical fields. The work consistently produces both intellectual property and scientist-entrepreneurs eager to exploit it by forming startup compa
SHOW US THE MONEY
SHOW US THE MONEY
By Peter GwynneSHOW US THE MONEYDespite limited sources of capital, would-be entrepreneurs with solid biobusiness ideas can usually obtain financial support.Art PappasJASON VARNEY | VARNEYPHOTO.COMIt might lack the intellectual cachet of life science in Boston-Cambridge and the Bay area, but North Carolina boasts a significant amount of research in biomedical fields. The work consistently produces both intellectual property and scientist-entrepreneurs eager to exploit it by forming startup compa
A GLOBAL OUTLOOK
A GLOBAL OUTLOOK
A GLOBAL OUTLOOKConsulting firm head draws on personal experience. MITCH JAVIDI JASON VARNEY | VARNEYPHOTO.COM When Mitch Javidi came to the United States from Iran at the age of 13, landing in Oklahoma, no one could have predicted that he would eventually run a highly successful company that is a catalyst for biotechnology in North Carolina. Javidi is CEO of the Catevo Group, which is head-quartered in Raleigh, NC, and with offices in Charlotte,
How It Works: Electronic Multichannel Micropipettor
How It Works: Electronic Multichannel Micropipettor
How It Works: Electronic Multichannel MicropipettorMultichannel micropipettors have drastically increased the rate at which samples can be prepared for modern high throughput assays. By automating the process with a fine-tuned digital motors and on-board software to conduct various pipetting tasks (forward, reverse, and repetitive pipetting, stepping, mixing, sequential aspiration, and programmable combinations of steps) electronic multichannel pipettors, such as the Finnpipette Novus
GIVING BACK
GIVING BACK
By David WilliamsonGIVING BACKNorth Carolina companies contribute time, healthcare, and more to their employees and communities.COURTESY OF LABCORP Once a month, Dave Dorsey leaves his job as an account executive at the SAS Institute in Cary, NC, where he markets computer programs worth hundreds of thousands of dollars a year, to handle a decidedly nonglamorous chore. For several hours, he hand-washes dirty meal trays used by homeless people visiting the Shepherd's Table Soup Kitchen in Raleig
North Carolina's Bioprocessing Industry Requires Highly Skilled Professionals
North Carolina's Bioprocessing Industry Requires Highly Skilled Professionals
North Carolina's Bioprocessing Industry Requires Highly Skilled ProfessionalsAs one of the top three bioprocess-manufacturing regions in the United States, North Carolina is challenged to meet the personnel needs of its growing biomanufacturing industry. North Carolina's new Biomanufacturing Training and Education Center (BTEC) at North Carolina State Universityis ensuring that, as the industry grows, the state continues to educate and grow a job-ready workforce. Working with funds from the Gold

Mail

Mail
Mail
"It is virtually useless to search for single factors as causes of complex diseases or to ascribe cause-effect relationships by simple, isolated, biochemical mechanisms." Hormones in milk Re: "What's in your milk?"1 Although Ron Kensinger claims that pasteurization reduces IGF-1, the opposite has been found.2 In addition, there is a huge difference in the ability of the body to regulate endogenous chemical signals compared to those which are foreign. There is a c

Notebook

Scooped by a blog
Scooped by a blog
Reed Cartwright" />Reed Cartwright One day in March 2005, Reed Cartwright jotted his thoughts on his blog, De Rerum Natura, after reading a paper that had just been published in Nature. Cartwright, then a PhD student in genetics at the University of Georgia, was skeptical. Susan Lolle and colleagues at Purdue University had found a peculiar phenomenon regarding a mutant gene, called hothead (hth), in Arabidopsis. In parents carrying the mutant hth gene, 10% of the progeny ended u
The Agenda
The Agenda
Credit: DENISE WYLLIE, www.wyllieohagan.com" /> Credit: DENISE WYLLIE, www.wyllieohagan.com WOMEN IN SCIENCE>> The new Rosalind Franklin Society, which aims to encourage women's participation in science, holds its inaugural meeting April 6 at The Rockefeller University in New York City. For more information, E-mail mliebert@liebertpub.com. VACCINE VENTURES>> After you read the feature on global vaccine policy on page 48 register for the Tenth Annual Confer
A war against war metaphors
A war against war metaphors
When the University of Nottingham, UK opened its new Center for Healthcare Associated Infections, a facility dedicated to studying and controlling "superbugs," The Guardian newspaper interviewed its director, Richard James, about why such a research center was necessary. He said: "This is a sophisticated army with astonishing weapons. And each time we develop something new, [bacteria] develop a defense for it." The use of such war metaphors in science and medicine is not new. As ear

Column

Socrates 2.0
Socrates 2.0
Can bioethics be taught on the Internet?

Profile

The Chromosome Queen
The Chromosome Queen
Nancy Kleckner, who grew up with molecular genetics, has answered some of the field's most important questions.

Scientist To Watch

Rachel Wilson: Death Defying
Rachel Wilson: Death Defying
Credit: © LEAH FASTEN PHOTOGRAPHY" /> Credit: © LEAH FASTEN PHOTOGRAPHY Rachel Wilson isn't used to backing down from a challenge. The subject of her graduate work at the University of California, San Francisco - lovingly referred to by peers as "the project of death" - sought the molecular mediator of retrograde signaling, how postsynaptic cells communicate with presynaptic cells. As the list of candidates on her legal pad dwindled, her colleagues offered some less than helpful advi

Lab Tools

An RNAi Rogue's Gallery
An RNAi Rogue's Gallery
How to size up the available libraries for high throughput screening in mammalian cells.

BioBusiness

The Moose in the Room
The Moose in the Room
Centocor CEO Neal Fowler learned valuable lessons in sales about straight talk that he hopes will help his company through uncertain times. Just don't ask him about potential layoffs.

Pulse Oximeter

Bringing Cancer Science to the Bedside
Bringing Cancer Science to the Bedside
NIH is investing millions of dollars in translational cancer research. How can you get involved?

Foundations

Fifty Years with Interferons
Fifty Years with Interferons
In 1981 Sidney Pestka and colleagues at Roche purified recombinant human leukocyte interferon from bacteria setting the stage for its structure elucidation. Credit: COURTESY OF SIDNEY PESTKA / PBL BIOMEDICAL LABORATORIES" />In 1981 Sidney Pestka and colleagues at Roche purified recombinant human leukocyte interferon from bacteria setting the stage for its structure elucidation. Credit: COURTESY OF SIDNEY PESTKA / PBL BIOMEDICAL LABORATORIES In 1957, Alick Isaacs and Jean Lindenmann, b
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