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Given Tight U.S. Economy, Science Leaders Consider FY 1995 R&D Budget Satisfactory
Given Tight U.S. Economy, Science Leaders Consider FY 1995 R&D Budget Satisfactory
They say the proposal may be the best they can get, but Rep. George Brown warns that it may not get through Congress intact Officials at major scientific societies and associations say they are generally satisfied with the Clinton administration's $71 billion budget request for science research and development in the 1995 fiscal year. The proposed funding levels, they contend, are about as favorable for the research community as cou
Alternative Medicine Ideas Widen Horizons In Biomedical Research
Alternative Medicine Ideas Widen Horizons In Biomedical Research
Editor's Note: This second part of a two-part series looks at researchers' efforts to establish rigorous methodologies to investigate alternative medical therapies. There are signs that tomorrow's medicine may be quite changed from today's, with medical schools now adding novel courses to their curricula, private funders helping establish new directions for biomedical investigations, and the United States searching for cost-effectiv
Alternative Medicine Ideas Widen Horizons In Biomedical Research
Alternative Medicine Ideas Widen Horizons In Biomedical Research
Editor's Note: This second part of a two-part series looks at researchers' efforts to establish rigorous methodologies to investigate alternative medical therapies. There are signs that tomorrow's medicine may be quite changed from today's, with medical schools now adding novel courses to their curricula, private funders helping establish new directions for biomedical investigations, and the United States searching for cost-effectiv
Given Tight U.S. Economy, Science Leaders Consider FY 1995 R&D Budget Satisfactory
Given Tight U.S. Economy, Science Leaders Consider FY 1995 R&D Budget Satisfactory
They say the proposal may be the best they can get, but Rep. George Brown warns that it may not get through Congress intact Officials at major scientific societies and associations say they are generally satisfied with the Clinton administration's $71 billion budget request for science research and development in the 1995 fiscal year. The proposed funding levels, they contend, are about as favorable for the research community as cou
Biomedical Researchers Mourn The Loss Of An Advocate
Biomedical Researchers Mourn The Loss Of An Advocate
"She was a remarkable woman," says Paul Berg, director of the Arnold and Mabel Beckman Center for Molecular and Genetic Medicine at the Stanford University Medical Center. "Had we been wise, we would have cloned her so we could use her today." In addition to convincing U.S. government leaders to step up the budget for medical research, Lasker did her own part to fund this work. She and her husband, the late Albert D. Lasker, owner
Biomedical Researchers Mourn The Loss Of An Advocate
Biomedical Researchers Mourn The Loss Of An Advocate
"She was a remarkable woman," says Paul Berg, director of the Arnold and Mabel Beckman Center for Molecular and Genetic Medicine at the Stanford University Medical Center. "Had we been wise, we would have cloned her so we could use her today." In addition to convincing U.S. government leaders to step up the budget for medical research, Lasker did her own part to fund this work. She and her husband, the late Albert D. Lasker, owner
Biomedical Researchers Meet In Anaheim For EB 94
Biomedical Researchers Meet In Anaheim For EB 94
Experimental Biology 94 is an interdisciplinary biomedical meeting and exposition to be held April 24-28. More than 6,000 oral and poster presentations are expected. Here is a sampling of special sessions. Preparing for Tenure: Five Perspectives Sunday, April 24, 4:00 P.M. Anaheim Convention Center, Room A2/3 The Use of Animals in Biomedical Research and Teaching: Where Do We Stand? Sunday, April 24, 4:00 P.M. Anaheim Hilton,
Biomedical Researchers Meet In Anaheim For EB 94
Biomedical Researchers Meet In Anaheim For EB 94
Experimental Biology 94 is an interdisciplinary biomedical meeting and exposition to be held April 24-28. More than 6,000 oral and poster presentations are expected. Here is a sampling of special sessions. Preparing for Tenure: Five Perspectives Sunday, April 24, 4:00 P.M. Anaheim Convention Center, Room A2/3 The Use of Animals in Biomedical Research and Teaching: Where Do We Stand? Sunday, April 24, 4:00 P.M. Anaheim Hilton,

Notebook

Notebook
Notebook
Harassment Hotline ACS Trains Chemistry Teachers Healthy Communication Webs of Desire Pediatric AIDS Internships Hard Cash For Software Viral-Resistant Vintage The widely publicized sex-discrimination case of Margaret Jensvold v. Donna Shalala--in which Jensvold, a former National Institutes of Health investigator, alleges discrimination, harassment, and retaliation against her by various officials of NIH and the Department of Heal
Notebook
Notebook
Harassment Hotline ACS Trains Chemistry Teachers Healthy Communication Webs of Desire Pediatric AIDS Internships Hard Cash For Software Viral-Resistant Vintage The widely publicized sex-discrimination case of Margaret Jensvold v. Donna Shalala--in which Jensvold, a former National Institutes of Health investigator, alleges discrimination, harassment, and retaliation against her by various officials of NIH and the Department of Heal

Opinion

Clearing The Path For Women Scientists
Clearing The Path For Women Scientists
Editor's Note: In 1991, with funding support from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation of New York, a sociologist and a chemist at Wellesley College led an interdisciplinary research team- -including social scientists, physical and life scientists, and mathematicians--in the first phase of an extensive study, called "Pathways for Women in the Sciences." The study addressed the issues of why undergraduate women set their sights on careers
Clearing The Path For Women Scientists
Clearing The Path For Women Scientists
Editor's Note: In 1991, with funding support from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation of New York, a sociologist and a chemist at Wellesley College led an interdisciplinary research team- -including social scientists, physical and life scientists, and mathematicians--in the first phase of an extensive study, called "Pathways for Women in the Sciences." The study addressed the issues of why undergraduate women set their sights on careers

Letter

Gallo On Montagnier
Gallo On Montagnier
The Scientist [Dec. 13, 1993, page 11]. Montagnier's statements, as far as I am concerned, are fair and accurate. Indeed, he has made it abundantly clear that once we knew the viruses from his lab and mine were the same subtype, there was never any doubt that the paper of Montagnier and coworkers was the first (F. Barre-Sinoussi, et al., Science, 220:868-71, 1983) to identify the virus later (M. Popovic, et al., Science, 224:497, 198
`Interesting' Juxtaposition
`Interesting' Juxtaposition
In his article, Hubel pointed out the ties between the terrorist Animal Liberation Front and the above-ground People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals. A January 1992 publication of the Office of Technology Assessment (Technology Against Terrorism: Structuring Security) links these groups with Barnard's own organization, the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, whose views, the OTA report notes, appear "to have little s
Gallo On Montagnier
Gallo On Montagnier
The Scientist [Dec. 13, 1993, page 11]. Montagnier's statements, as far as I am concerned, are fair and accurate. Indeed, he has made it abundantly clear that once we knew the viruses from his lab and mine were the same subtype, there was never any doubt that the paper of Montagnier and coworkers was the first (F. Barre-Sinoussi, et al., Science, 220:868-71, 1983) to identify the virus later (M. Popovic, et al., Science, 224:497, 198
`Interesting' Juxtaposition
`Interesting' Juxtaposition
In his article, Hubel pointed out the ties between the terrorist Animal Liberation Front and the above-ground People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals. A January 1992 publication of the Office of Technology Assessment (Technology Against Terrorism: Structuring Security) links these groups with Barnard's own organization, the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, whose views, the OTA report notes, appear "to have little s

Commentary

Science Will Survive The Recurring Tension Among Researchers, Librarians, And Publishers
Science Will Survive The Recurring Tension Among Researchers, Librarians, And Publishers
Scientists would like libraries to be comprehensively stocked with the specialized journals that support their investigative work. Conscientious library administrators, while sympathetic to their clients' needs, nevertheless complain that rising costs of science publications, along with space constraints and lack of personnel, frustrate their efforts to accommodate all users. Meanwhile, many publishers, while professing the desire t
Science Will Survive The Recurring Tension Among Researchers, Librarians, And Publishers
Science Will Survive The Recurring Tension Among Researchers, Librarians, And Publishers
Scientists would like libraries to be comprehensively stocked with the specialized journals that support their investigative work. Conscientious library administrators, while sympathetic to their clients' needs, nevertheless complain that rising costs of science publications, along with space constraints and lack of personnel, frustrate their efforts to accommodate all users. Meanwhile, many publishers, while professing the desire t

Research

The Science Of Sex: What Is It And Who's Doing It?
The Science Of Sex: What Is It And Who's Doing It?
Although it is a widespread field of study, sex research-- particularly that dealing with human sexuality--is still subject to stigma, many scientists agree. "It's okay to use sex for advertising--Pepsi, beer, and Calvin Klein jeans--but when it comes to research, sex is still a bad word," says Robert Friar, a professor at Ferris State University in Big Rapids, Mich., where he teaches anatomy and physiology and a course on human s
The Science Of Sex: What Is It And Who's Doing It?
The Science Of Sex: What Is It And Who's Doing It?
Although it is a widespread field of study, sex research-- particularly that dealing with human sexuality--is still subject to stigma, many scientists agree. "It's okay to use sex for advertising--Pepsi, beer, and Calvin Klein jeans--but when it comes to research, sex is still a bad word," says Robert Friar, a professor at Ferris State University in Big Rapids, Mich., where he teaches anatomy and physiology and a course on human s

Hot Paper

Chemistry
Chemistry
D.F. Hunt, R.A. Henderson, J. Shabanowitz, K. Sakaguchi, H. Michel, N. Sevilir, A.L. Cox, E. Appella, V.H. Engelhard, "Characterization of peptides bound to the class I MHC molecule HLA-A2.1 by mass spectrometry," Science, 255:1261- 3, 1992. D.F. Hunt, H. Michel, T.A. Dickinson, J. Sha-banowitz, A.L. Cox, K. Sakaguchi, E. Appella, H.M. Grey, A. Sette, "Peptides presented to the immune system by the murine class II major histocompati
Molecular Biology
Molecular Biology
Peter H. Seeburg (Center for Molecular Biology, University of Heidelberg): "In our brain, nerve cells communicate by chemical transmission at specialized structures termed synapses. Most excitatory synapses use the neurotransmitter L-glutamate, which activates specific receptor channels in the postsynaptic membrane. Molecularly and functionally different glutamate-activated channels are expressed by the brain, presumably tailored t
Chemistry
Chemistry
D.F. Hunt, R.A. Henderson, J. Shabanowitz, K. Sakaguchi, H. Michel, N. Sevilir, A.L. Cox, E. Appella, V.H. Engelhard, "Characterization of peptides bound to the class I MHC molecule HLA-A2.1 by mass spectrometry," Science, 255:1261- 3, 1992. D.F. Hunt, H. Michel, T.A. Dickinson, J. Sha-banowitz, A.L. Cox, K. Sakaguchi, E. Appella, H.M. Grey, A. Sette, "Peptides presented to the immune system by the murine class II major histocompati
Molecular Biology
Molecular Biology
Peter H. Seeburg (Center for Molecular Biology, University of Heidelberg): "In our brain, nerve cells communicate by chemical transmission at specialized structures termed synapses. Most excitatory synapses use the neurotransmitter L-glutamate, which activates specific receptor channels in the postsynaptic membrane. Molecularly and functionally different glutamate-activated channels are expressed by the brain, presumably tailored t

Tools and Technology

Computers Make Gains In Enhancing Electrophoresis
Computers Make Gains In Enhancing Electrophoresis
With the use of computers for primary data capture, display, and analysis becoming more and more pervasive, it is common now for there to be no photographic negative or laboratory notebook backing up published images and data interpretations of gel electrophoresis experiments. The degree of enhancement exercised with a given image, then, becomes difficult to review for possible misrepresentation, whether intentional or accidental.
Computers Make Gains In Enhancing Electrophoresis
Computers Make Gains In Enhancing Electrophoresis
With the use of computers for primary data capture, display, and analysis becoming more and more pervasive, it is common now for there to be no photographic negative or laboratory notebook backing up published images and data interpretations of gel electrophoresis experiments. The degree of enhancement exercised with a given image, then, becomes difficult to review for possible misrepresentation, whether intentional or accidental.

New Products

New Products
New Products
Unisyn Technologies, based in San Diego, has released its Cell-Pharm System 1000 research- to pilot-scale cell culture system for producing biomolecules. Designed with hollow fiber bioreactor technology, the system provides highly concentrated, debris-free supernatants to simplify downstream purification, improve yields, and broaden cell production range, according to the manufacturer. The Cell-Pharm System 1000 is a self-contained
New Products
New Products
Unisyn Technologies, based in San Diego, has released its Cell-Pharm System 1000 research- to pilot-scale cell culture system for producing biomolecules. Designed with hollow fiber bioreactor technology, the system provides highly concentrated, debris-free supernatants to simplify downstream purification, improve yields, and broaden cell production range, according to the manufacturer. The Cell-Pharm System 1000 is a self-contained

Profession

Book Publishing Jobs Offer Scientists Flexibility, Security
Book Publishing Jobs Offer Scientists Flexibility, Security
A publishing job, for example, can offer flexibility in work sites and schedules, greater job security than many research positions, and a relief from the burnout that can result from focusing too intently on a single scientific question. One editor's chair that's especially well filled by scientists is that of an acquisitions editor, who signs up new books for publication. "About half of the acquisitions editors I know got a Ph.D.
Book Publishing Jobs Offer Scientists Flexibility, Security
Book Publishing Jobs Offer Scientists Flexibility, Security
A publishing job, for example, can offer flexibility in work sites and schedules, greater job security than many research positions, and a relief from the burnout that can result from focusing too intently on a single scientific question. One editor's chair that's especially well filled by scientists is that of an acquisitions editor, who signs up new books for publication. "About half of the acquisitions editors I know got a Ph.D.
People: DuPont Chemist Receives Priestley Medal
People: DuPont Chemist Receives Priestley Medal
Simmons, 64, will receive the medal at the national ACS meeting in San Diego this month. Being presented with the award caught Simmons by surprise. "The Priestley Medal hasn't been given very often to industrial people. I wasn't anticipating it," he says. In the award announcement, ACS explains that Simmons "is being recognized for his many years of distinguished service to chemical science, industry, and society." Simmons is prim
People: DuPont Chemist Receives Priestley Medal
People: DuPont Chemist Receives Priestley Medal
Simmons, 64, will receive the medal at the national ACS meeting in San Diego this month. Being presented with the award caught Simmons by surprise. "The Priestley Medal hasn't been given very often to industrial people. I wasn't anticipating it," he says. In the award announcement, ACS explains that Simmons "is being recognized for his many years of distinguished service to chemical science, industry, and society." Simmons is prim
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