Editorial

Why We Need Institutional Repositories
Why We Need Institutional Repositories
It used to be that the record of scientific work was complete when it was all published in journals.

About Us

Meet This Issue's Contributors
Meet This Issue's Contributors
began working on DNA-damage response as a graduate student more than 20 years ago.

Letter

Dalai Drama
Dalai Drama
There is clearly politics masked beneath science when it comes to the controversy over the Dalai Lama speaking at the Society for Neuroscience meeting.1 That many of the petition's organizers are of Chinese origin is a dead giveaway about the political motivations of the petitioners. We just "know the Buddhists more than Western people do," says Min Zhuo from University of Toronto, who helped draft the petition. Did he consult any neuroscientists of Indian origin? Surely the Indians also know th
Fixing NIH peer review
Fixing NIH peer review
Re: How to fix peer review.1 I currently serve on review panels for the Department of Defense Congressionally-Directed Medical Research Programs in breast and prostate cancers. A stated goal of this funding program is to stress innovation. That makes it unlike NIH programs that require extensive preliminary data – typically the first specific aim of the grant – and are looking for the next logical step in a non-controversial research plan. While the DOD research proposal is significa
Scientists' salaries and academic prestige
Scientists' salaries and academic prestige
Mean 9-month salaries of full professors as a function of the institution's academic reputation. Academic year 2004–05. The correlation coefficient for this sample of 14 universities is r = 0.96 (p < 0.001). Salary data from the AAUP's annual report.2 Reputation data from the U.S. News &World Report's college guide (peer assessment).3Adjusted 9-month salaries of full professors as a function of the institution's academic reputation. Academic year 2004–05. The correlation coeff

Opinion

Stem Cell Research's Reversal of Fortune
Stem Cell Research's Reversal of Fortune
The conventional wisdom among the scientific community and the public is that the present federal US policy on stem cell research, which provides National Institutes of Health funding only for research on stem cell lines developed before August 2001, has significantly reduced funding for stem cell research and diminished the translation of this platform technology to important therapies.

Notebook

Stem cell rumble on the prairie
Stem cell rumble on the prairie
William Neaves could be forgiven for feeling popular last month.
Sotheby's offers nearly-extinct pine
Sotheby's offers nearly-extinct pine
Sydney's Royal Botanic Gardens occupy a lovely parcel of harbor-side land, right alongside Australia's biggest downtown district.
Murder at the Lasker Awards
Murder at the Lasker Awards
It's tough to please an elite crowd of scientists, financiers, and other luminaries.

Feature

The Hunt for New Antibiotics
The Hunt for New Antibiotics
Bacterial infections are responsible for one quarter of all deaths, a number that may rise with the alarming increase in multi-drug resistant strains.
Battling Evolution to Fight Antibiotic Resistance
Battling Evolution to Fight Antibiotic Resistance
For any new antibiotic, resistant bacteria typically show up in four years, or less.

Vision

DNA Damage Responses: Cancer and Beyond
DNA Damage Responses: Cancer and Beyond
The composition and sequence of 3 billion bases of DNA serve as a major determinant of our individual physiology.

Research

A Nuclear Model of Gene Regulation
A Nuclear Model of Gene Regulation
and many since have sought to explain correlations between a gene's physical location and its activity.

Hot Paper

Genetics Embraces Expression
Genetics Embraces Expression
In the years since they were first developed, microarrays have been applied to an extraordinary range of situations.

Briefs

Brain genes changing
Brain genes changing
The human brain is still evolving.
Interdisciplinary Research
Interdisciplinary Research
These papers were selected from multiple disciplines from the Faculty of 1000, a Web-based literature awareness tool http://www.facultyof1000.com.A.J. Dupuy et al., "Mammalian mutagenesis using a highly mobile somatic Sleeping Beauty transposon system," Nature, 436:221–6, July 14, 2005.This paper describes a modification of the Sleeping Beauty fish transposon which allows it to be used for efficient mutagenesis screens in mice. The authors provide proof-of-principle for the usefulness of t
Nanotubes link immune cells
Nanotubes link immune cells
Nature has once again beaten nanotechnology to the punch.

Technology

Give your Protein a Tune-up
Give your Protein a Tune-up
Gadget freaks love to "mod" their toys, and protein engineers are no exception.
Preparing for SARS
Preparing for SARS
When the next outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) will emerge is anyone's guess.
New Arrays Open 'Junk DNA' to Exploration
New Arrays Open 'Junk DNA' to Exploration
Microarrays present researchers with something of a catch-22: In order to find something, you have to know what you're looking for.

Tools and Technology

Tissue Microarrays Go Coreless
Tissue Microarrays Go Coreless
To study tissue samples from multiple patients, researchers use tissue microarrays (TMAs), a technology in which hundreds of tissue cores are arranged on a single glass slide for analysis by immunostaining or in situ hybridization.
The Reagent Automat
The Reagent Automat
Courtesy of Eppendorf UKHungry scientists taking a trip to the vending machine for refreshments may soon find Taq polymerase and IPTG next to their Coke and M&Ms. Helena BioSciences of Sunderland, UK http://www.helena-biosciences.com has developed the Smartstore, a -20°C reagent-vending system for 40 Eppendorf and Fermentas reagents. The machine, which is accessed via a cashless "smartcard" that can also track inventory wirelessly, is offered free-of-charge to research institutes, and r
Mission: RNAi
Mission: RNAi
Most commercially available reagents for RNAi are synthetic oligos, which can yield good results with immortalized cell lines but are less effective in hard-to-transfect primary cells.
Miniaturizing the Chemostat
Miniaturizing the Chemostat
Researchers at Stanford University have miniaturized the chemostat, a device widely used as a steady culture environment for bacterial cultures.1 Using only 16 nanoliters of culture media (nearly 109 less volume than conventional chemostats), the "microchemostat" avoids the problem of biofilm, which grows on chemostat walls and ultimately leaks into the culture media, causing contamination.The group worked out a cleaning scheme in which one of the device's six independent reactors is closed off
Simplify Your Sera with MARS
Simplify Your Sera with MARS
With just a few protein comprising 85% to 90% of human serum, low-abundance components can be difficult to identify by mass spectrometry.

BioBusiness

When Biotechs get Makeovers
When Biotechs get Makeovers
It was the beginning of 2002, and employees of Renovis, a biopharmaceutical company based in San Francisco had many reasons to celebrate.

Update

US biomedical research funding doubles, with help from industry
US biomedical research funding doubles, with help from industry
© Anthony FosterFunding for biomedical research in the United States jumped from $37.1 billion in 1994 to $94.3 billion in 2003, a doubling of support when adjusted for inflation, according to a recent study in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Private industry provided 57% of this total and the National Institutes of Health supplied 28%."We were surprised to find that the total numbers are as large as they are," says lead author Hamilton Moses III, chairman of the Alerion In
MRI researchers warn against new EU legislation
MRI researchers warn against new EU legislation
European Union legislation designed to limit workers' exposure to electromagnetic radiation will seriously hinder research involving the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), leading investigators warned the British government recently.
Pharmacogenetics overhyped, says UK Royal Society
Pharmacogenetics overhyped, says UK Royal Society
The field of pharmacogenetics has been overhyped and is still more than a decade away from living up to its promise in clinical practice, largely due to shortages in researchers and lack of international coordination, according to a recent report from the UK's Royal Society.

Atlas

BioShanghai
BioShanghai
Think of China, and what comes to mind?

Closing Bell

To Fight Plague, Look to Russia's Past
To Fight Plague, Look to Russia's Past
A century before Ebola, SARS, or avian flu began making head-lines, another invisible killer was carving a swath of death and fear across the Russian Empire: the plague.