Slime mold colony with volcano-like spores
Cancer-like Slime Mold Growth Hints at Multicellularity’s Origins
The poorly understood Fonticula alba, a relative of fungi and animals, hunts bacteria with a mechanism that resembles cancer and fungal growth.
ABOVE: Marko Kaksonen
Cancer-like Slime Mold Growth Hints at Multicellularity’s Origins
Cancer-like Slime Mold Growth Hints at Multicellularity’s Origins

The poorly understood Fonticula alba, a relative of fungi and animals, hunts bacteria with a mechanism that resembles cancer and fungal growth.

The poorly understood Fonticula alba, a relative of fungi and animals, hunts bacteria with a mechanism that resembles cancer and fungal growth.

ABOVE: Marko Kaksonen

amoeba

amoeba Entamoeba histolytica trogocytosis human cell surface protein
Image of the Day: Amoeba Nibbles
Chia-Yi Hou | May 2, 2019
A pathogenic amoeba species ingests parts of human cells and steals human cell membrane proteins to display on its own surface.
Image of the Day: Giant Virus
The Scientist Staff, The Scientist Staff | Feb 28, 2018
The Tupanvirus is named for the South American Guarani God of Thunder.
Image of the Day: Amoebot
The Scientist Staff | Mar 2, 2017
Scientists create an amoeba-inspired robotic cell, with photo-responsive DNA that allows it to move when exposed to light.
Image of the Day: Gandalf’s Hat
The Scientist Staff | Feb 12, 2017
A new species of amoeba, Arcella gandalfi, is covered in a shell that resembles a wizard’s hat.
Amoebae Have Human-Like Immunity
Jef Akst | Mar 2, 2016
Dictyostelium discoideum produce extracellular nets that can kill bacteria, just as phagocytes in people and other higher animals do, according to a study.
Genome Digest
Molly Sharlach | Oct 13, 2014
What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes
Amoeba Eats Cells Alive
Ed Yong | Apr 9, 2014
The intestinal parasite Entamoeba histolytica kills host cells by tearing pieces from them, which it then eats.