Salamander on log
Science Snapshot: Free Fallin’ Salamanders
Arboreal salamanders use skydiving techniques to avoid smashing to the ground after a fall.
ABOVE: Christian Brown
Science Snapshot: Free Fallin’ Salamanders
Science Snapshot: Free Fallin’ Salamanders

Arboreal salamanders use skydiving techniques to avoid smashing to the ground after a fall.

Arboreal salamanders use skydiving techniques to avoid smashing to the ground after a fall.

ABOVE: Christian Brown

amphibians

Collage of those featured in the article
Remembering Those We Lost in 2021
Lisa Winter | Dec 23, 2021
As the year draws to a close, we look back on researchers we bid farewell to, and the contributions they made to their respective fields.
Photographs of animals
Numerosity Around the Animal Kingdom
Catherine Offord | Oct 1, 2021
Research in recent decades has explored how animals other than humans perceive different numbers of objects
David Wake is facing the camera, smiling.
Salamander Expert David Wake Dies at 84
Lisa Winter | May 21, 2021
Throughout his career, the University of California, Berkeley, herpetologist named 144 species of salamanders.
Amphibian Conservation Champion Phil Bishop Dies
Lisa Winter | Feb 4, 2021
His career was dedicated to understanding and protecting frog populations.
Glowing Amphibians Extremely Common
Lisa Winter | Feb 28, 2020
A study of the animals using blue light reveals what humans are not able to see with the naked eye.
Researchers Fight a Devastating Amphibian Infection Using Heat
Jennifer Parker | Jan 13, 2020
They’ve survived volcanic eruptions, but one Caribbean island’s mountain chicken frogs might need help from scientists to escape the lethal chytrid fungus.
Saving Mountain Chickens
The Scientist Staff | Jan 13, 2020
Peek inside the effort to save this critically endangered Caribbean frog species.
Eating Up the Food Chain
The Scientist Staff | Jan 13, 2020
Watch a predaceous diving beetle dine on a tadpole.
Saving the Hellbender, a Giant Salamander Under Threat
Mary Bates | Sep 1, 2019
Populations of the two-foot-long amphibians are declining across North America. Scientists are struggling to find out why, before it’s too late.
amphibian hindlimb chicken animal feet hand development reactive oxygen species fingers digits webbing webbed
Image of the Day: Phantom Limbs
Chia-Yi Hou | Jun 17, 2019
Researchers study how oxygen around an embryo helps shape the way feet and digits form in amphibians and chickens.
Frog-Killing Chytrid Fungus Far Deadlier than Scientists Realized
Carolyn Wilke | Mar 29, 2019
A survey reveals the disease has decimated populations in Central and South America and tropical Australia and contributed to the extinction of 90 species.
Origin of Frog-Killing Chytrid Fungus Found
Ruth Williams | May 10, 2018
DNA evidence points to Asian amphibians as the source of a fatal disease that has been wiping out frogs across the globe.  
Frogs Fight Back From Fungal Attack
Ruth Williams | Mar 29, 2018
A decade after chytridiomycosis killed scores of amphibians in Panama, some species are recovering. New research indicates why.  
Tadpoles Keep Eating Because They Don’t Feel Full
Catherine Offord | Mar 27, 2018
Baby frogs don’t develop the neural circuitry responsible for feeding inhibition until they begin metamorphosing into adults. 
Image of the Day: Frog Leaps Away from Extinction 
The Scientist Staff, The Scientist Staff | Jan 3, 2018
A once critically endangered species of leaf frog has made a comeback. 
Image of the Day: Night Crawler
The Scientist Staff | Apr 17, 2017
Phyllomedusa bicolor is a nocturnal, tree-dwelling frog that lives in the Amazon rainforest.
Scientists Discover First Fluorescent Frog
Diana Kwon | Mar 14, 2017
The polka dot tree frog (Hypsiboas punctatus) glows under a blacklight, due to the presence of three fluorescent molecules in its lymph tissue and skin. 
TS Picks: October 17, 2016
Kerry Grens | Oct 17, 2016
Problematic dietary advice; the man whose cells were fixed with CRISPR; treating toads
Swallowing Without a Tongue
Jenny Rood | Mar 18, 2015
On land, mudskippers use mouthfuls of water like land-based amphibians use their fleshy tongues to catch and swallow prey.