Lipid Droplets Are Intracellular Bacteria-Fighting Machines
Lipid Droplets Are Intracellular Bacteria-Fighting Machines
Far from being inert fat-storage depots within cells, these lipid-loaded organelles recruit immune proteins and block bacterial growth.
Lipid Droplets Are Intracellular Bacteria-Fighting Machines
Lipid Droplets Are Intracellular Bacteria-Fighting Machines

Far from being inert fat-storage depots within cells, these lipid-loaded organelles recruit immune proteins and block bacterial growth.

Far from being inert fat-storage depots within cells, these lipid-loaded organelles recruit immune proteins and block bacterial growth.

antimicrobial peptide
Ants Produce Antibiotics that May Protect Plants
Ants Produce Antibiotics that May Protect Plants
Emily Makowski | Mar 1, 2020
The antimicrobial compounds ants excrete to defend themselves from pathogens may protect plants as well.
Will Komodo Dragons Yield the Next Blockbuster Antibiotic?
Will Komodo Dragons Yield the Next Blockbuster Antibiotic?
Jef Akst | Apr 30, 2017
The giant lizards have numerous microbicidal compounds in their blood.
Commensal Defense
Commensal Defense
Kate Yandell | Jan 8, 2015
Beneficial gut bacteria have evolved resistance to antimicrobial peptides that hosts release to fight pathogens.
Scorpion Venom Kills MRSA
Jef Akst | Jul 12, 2012
Peptides extracted from scorpion venom fights off drug-resistant bacterial infections in mice.
Reading Tea Leaves
Jef Akst | Jan 31, 2012
Cyclic peptides, discovered in an African tea used to speed labor and delivery, may hold potential as drug-stabilizing scaffolds, antibiotics, and anticancer drugs.
Antimicrobial Cross-Resistance Risk
Sabrina Richards | Jan 24, 2012
Bacteria that evolve resistance to antimicrobial therapies may be able to evade natural immune peptides.