Light-Activated Nanodevices Control Cells
Light-Activated Nanodevices Control Cells
DNA-coated gold nanorods enable cells to be activated by light without genetic manipulation.
Light-Activated Nanodevices Control Cells
Light-Activated Nanodevices Control Cells

DNA-coated gold nanorods enable cells to be activated by light without genetic manipulation.

DNA-coated gold nanorods enable cells to be activated by light without genetic manipulation.

aptamers
Developing Aptamer Biosensor Technology for Diagnostics and Therapeutics
Expanding the Available Target Range for New Drugs and Diagnostics with Aptamers
The Scientist Creative Services Team and aptamer Group | May 3, 2022
In this roundtable discussion, an expert panel will discuss how the latest applications of aptamer technology are enabling innovation across the life sciences by replacing antibodies.
Glucometers Detect SARS-CoV-2 Infection Within an Hour
Roni Dengler, PhD | Jun 14, 2021
Glucometers are easy-to-use, cheap, and highly scalable. And they are 100 percent accurate at detecting SARS-CoV-2.
Infographic: Optogenetics Without Genetic Engineering
Ruth Williams | Sep 1, 2019
DNA-loaded nanoparticles that respond to infrared light provide an alternative way to control cell behavior.
Serum Survey Reveals Protein Patterns of Ill Health
Ruth Williams | Aug 2, 2018
Analyses of blood from thousands of people show distinct protein profiles are linked to complex diseases of aging.
Contributors
Karen Zusi | Feb 1, 2016
Meet some of the people featured in the February 2016 issue of The Scientist.
Fighting Back
Mary Beth Aberlin | Feb 1, 2016
Plants can’t run away from attackers, so they’ve evolved unique immune defenses to protect themselves.
Antibody Alternatives
Paul Ko Ferrigno and Jane McLeod | Feb 1, 2016
Nucleic acid aptamers and protein scaffolds could change the way researchers study biological processes and treat disease.
Building Better Reagents
Jane McLeod and Paul Ko Ferrigno | Jan 31, 2016
Facing problems of inconsistent, time-consuming, and costly antibody production, some researchers are turning to alternatives to target specific proteins of interest, in the lab and in the clinic.