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This is DishBrain, an in vitro system that combines human brain cells with artificial intelligence technology, which researchers at Australian biotech Cortical Labs recently trained to play the classic 1972 Atari video game Pong. Fluorescent markers show axons in green, neuron bodies in purple, dendrites in red, and all other cells in blue. Where multiple markers are present, colors are merged and typically appear as yellow or pink. Posted: October 12, 2022
Caught on Camera
See some of the coolest images recently featured by The Scientist.
Caught on Camera
Caught on Camera

See some of the coolest images recently featured by The Scientist.

See some of the coolest images recently featured by The Scientist.

cilia
Squiggly green cilia on blue human beta cells
Pancreatic Cell Cilia Wiggle to Control Insulin Release
Shafaq Zia | Oct 6, 2022 | 3 min read
Tiny hairlike structures on pancreatic cells have long been considered static sensors. Now, researchers say they move and help regulate insulin secretion.
Image of an abstract fractal blue and green sea shell.
Cell Chirality Offers Clues to the Mystery of Body Asymmetry
Catherine Offord | Feb 1, 2022 | 10+ min read
Researchers explore the idea that molecular patterns in individual cells could underlie the development of a left and a right in animals.
colored microscope photo of xenobot
“Xenobot” Living Robots Can Reproduce
Chloe Tenn | Dec 2, 2021 | 2 min read
Biological robots made from frog cells can replicate by smooshing loose cells into new robots—a reproduction method not seen in any other organism.
Image of the Day: Defective Cilia
Amy Schleunes | Apr 7, 2020 | 1 min read
Super-resolution imaging identifies abnormalities in the hair-like protrusions on a cell’s surface and may help facilitate earlier detection of primary ciliary dyskinesia.
Image of the Day: Microscopic Creatures
Emily Makowski | Dec 12, 2019 | 1 min read
View the top three winners of this year’s Nikon Small World in Motion Competition.
Image of the Day: Water Sensors
Carolyn Wilke | Feb 19, 2019 | 1 min read
Zebrafish detect water movement around them through signals sent to the brain by cells containing tiny hairs.
Review Preview
The Scientist Staff | Dec 10, 2018 | 1 min read
Hear this month’s Scientist to Watch, Prachee Avasthi, describe the preprint journal review club she started at the University of Kansas Medical Center.
Prachee Avasthi Explores How Cells Build and Maintain Cilia
Shawna Williams | Dec 1, 2018 | 3 min read
The University of Kansas professor is also known for her leadership among early-career researchers.
Image of the Day: Revved Up
Sukanya Charuchandra | Aug 16, 2018 | 1 min read
Progesterone helps in the transportation of eggs within the mouse reproductive system.
Primary Cilia in Neurons Linked to Obesity
Abby Olena, PhD | Jan 8, 2018 | 3 min read
Three studies—one of mice and two of human genetics—describe the role of two proteins, adenylyl cyclase and melanocortin 4 receptor, in the development of obesity and diabetes. 
Taking the Long View
Karen Hopkin | Sep 1, 2012 | 9 min read
In exploring how embryos take shape, John Wallingford has identified a key pathway involved in vertebrate development—and human disease.
Of Frogs and Embryos
Karen Hopkin | Sep 1, 2012 | 1 min read
Associate Professor in Molecular Cell & Developmental Biology at the University of Texas at Austin, John Wallingford, makes his living using cutting-edge microscopic techniques to watch developmental events unfold in real time.
Next Generation: Ciliated Sensor
Sabrina Richards | Jul 30, 2012 | 3 min read
Researchers create a sensitive, flexible mechanosensor with possible applications in biomedical sensing and artificial skin technology.
News from Cell
Cristina Luiggi | Dec 9, 2011 | 4 min read
Some of the highlights from this year’s American Society for Cell Biology meeting, held earlier this week
The Ninefold Ring
Richard P. Grant | Jul 1, 2011 | 2 min read
Editor’s Choice in Structural Biology
Chasing the Cilium
Megan Stephan | Oct 10, 2004 | 7 min read
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