WHO Leads in Using Solid Science to Draft COVID-19 Policy: Study
WHO Leads in Using Solid Science to Draft COVID-19 Policy: Study
Governments are variable in their reliance on highly cited research, while international intergovernmental organizations such as the World Health Organization reliably link policy and science, according to an analysis of thousands of policy documents from the first half of 2020.
WHO Leads in Using Solid Science to Draft COVID-19 Policy: Study
WHO Leads in Using Solid Science to Draft COVID-19 Policy: Study

Governments are variable in their reliance on highly cited research, while international intergovernmental organizations such as the World Health Organization reliably link policy and science, according to an analysis of thousands of policy documents from the first half of 2020.

Governments are variable in their reliance on highly cited research, while international intergovernmental organizations such as the World Health Organization reliably link policy and science, according to an analysis of thousands of policy documents from the first half of 2020.

citations
Citations Are the Currency of Science
Citations Are the Currency of Science
Sibrandes Poppema | Dec 1, 2020
Then there are the counterfeiters.
Contributors
Contributors
The Scientist Staff | Dec 1, 2020
Meet some of the people featured in the December 2020 issue of The Scientist.
Updated Dec 21
Paper Recommends Women Avoid Female Mentors, Drawing Outrage
Paper Recommends Women Avoid Female Mentors, Drawing Outrage
Viviane Callier | Nov 24, 2020
A study makes policy recommendations to optimize citations, but critics say it fails to acknowledge that citations are a biased and narrow measure of scientific success.
Men Promote Scientific Findings More Effusively than Women Do
Men Promote Scientific Findings More Effusively than Women Do
Lisa Winter | Dec 17, 2019
Male researchers are more likely to describe their work in publications using positive superlatives than their female colleagues are, a habit tied to more citations.
Bigger Is Not Always Better for Team Science
Bigger Is Not Always Better for Team Science
Ruth Williams | Feb 13, 2019
Small research groups tend to beat large collaborations when it comes to producing innovative projects and breakthrough discoveries.
Clarivate Ranks Most-Cited Researchers of 2017
Clarivate Ranks Most-Cited Researchers of 2017
Catherine Offord | Nov 15, 2017
China shows the biggest increase of any country in the number of scientists listed since last year, while cancer genomics emerges as one of the more dominant fields.
Papers Based on Misidentified Cell Lines Top 32,000
Papers Based on Misidentified Cell Lines Top 32,000
Kerry Grens | Oct 16, 2017
An analysis of contaminated literature finds that tens of thousands of papers used cell lines of questionable origins—and these were in turn cited by hundreds of thousands of other papers.
Retractions Damage Scientists’ Reputations: Study
Retractions Damage Scientists’ Reputations: Study
Aggie Mika | Sep 8, 2017
Authors of rescinded papers see a 10 percent to 20 percent decline in citation rates for their other publications. 
Nature Index Identifies Top Contributors to Innovation
Nature Index Identifies Top Contributors to Innovation
Catherine Offord | Aug 9, 2017
New rankings highlight institutions that have produced large numbers of articles cited in others' patents.
Open Access On the Rise: Study
Open Access On the Rise: Study
Bob Grant | Aug 6, 2017
The Scientist sat down with one of the authors of a recent analysis that quantifies the increasing incursion of open-access content into the world of scholarly publishing.
TS Picks: April 7, 2017
TS Picks: April 7, 2017
Bob Grant | Apr 7, 2017
Consortium pushes for open citation data; Gates Foundation launches open-access publishing platform; Cell Press lifts the veil on papers under consideration; an online widget circumvents some paywalls
Scientometrics Pioneer Eugene Garfield Dies
Scientometrics Pioneer Eugene Garfield Dies
The Scientist Staff | Feb 27, 2017
Eugene Garfield, founder of the Institute for Scientific Information and The Scientist, has passed away at age 91.
TS Picks: Remembering Eugene Garfield
TS Picks: Remembering Eugene Garfield
Joshua A. Krisch | Feb 27, 2017
A look back at the contributions of The Scientist’s founder, scientometrics pioneer Eugene Garfield (1925–2017)
Predicting Scientific Success
Predicting Scientific Success
Ruth Williams | Nov 3, 2016
A scientist’s most influential paper may come at any point in her career but chances are it won’t change her overall success, researchers show.
Web of Science Sold for More Than $3 Billion
Web of Science Sold for More Than $3 Billion
Bob Grant | Jul 15, 2016
Thomson Reuters has transferred the science-citation database, along with the rest of its intellectual property and science division, to private-equity firms.
Shorter Titles Not Always Better for Citations
Shorter Titles Not Always Better for Citations
Jef Akst | Jun 22, 2016
Researchers find that scientific papers with shorter titles accrue more citations only if they are very popular. For papers flying under the radar, longer titles fare better.
NIH Grant Reviews Don’t Predict Success
NIH Grant Reviews Don’t Predict Success
Kerry Grens | Feb 18, 2016
Peer reviewers’ assessments of funding proposals to the National Institutes of Health don’t correlate well with later publication citations, a study shows.
A Literature Database with Smarts
A Literature Database with Smarts
Kerry Grens | Nov 3, 2015
Semantic Scholar uses machine reading and vision to extract meaning and impact from academic papers.
Parsing Negative Citations
Parsing Negative Citations
Kelly Rae Chi | Oct 26, 2015
A new tool helps scientists better understand what happens to studies that are criticized in the literature.