Illustration of scientists collaborating
How to Bring the Public into the Scientific Process
A new wave of research is recruiting patients and other members of the public to serve as equal partners, bringing fresh perspectives to research on diseases and other conditions.
ABOVE: MODIFIED FROM © ISTOCK.COM, ELIZALIV
How to Bring the Public into the Scientific Process
How to Bring the Public into the Scientific Process

A new wave of research is recruiting patients and other members of the public to serve as equal partners, bringing fresh perspectives to research on diseases and other conditions.

A new wave of research is recruiting patients and other members of the public to serve as equal partners, bringing fresh perspectives to research on diseases and other conditions.

ABOVE: MODIFIED FROM © ISTOCK.COM, ELIZALIV

clinical trial participants

Artist's rendition of a yellow CAR T cell near a red cancer cell surrounded by red blood cells.
Ten Years On, CAR T Cell Recipient Is Still Cancer-Free
Jef Akst | Feb 3, 2022
First, the genetically engineered cells became CD8+ killer T cells that wiped out his leukemia. Then they transformed into a stable population of CD4+ helper T cells that continue to circulate in his body.
An artistic rendering of blue neurons against a white background
Participant’s Diagnosis Halts Gene Therapy Clinical Trial
Amanda Heidt | Aug 12, 2021
The FDA pauses the research program on a lentivirus-based treatment for a rare neurological condition after a patient developed a bone marrow disorder that could presage leukemia.
An illustration of a DNA double helix in gold with texture
Gene Therapy Continues to Benefit Kids with Immunodeficiency
Jef Akst | May 12, 2021
Four dozen children with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) who received a corrective gene carried by a virus have working immune systems two to three years later, according to three independent clinical trials.
Pandemic Accelerates Trend Toward Remote Clinical Trials
Jef Akst | May 1, 2021
Now more than ever before, recruiting patients for a research study doesn’t have to mean getting them to leave their homes.
COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2, pandemic, coronavirus, clinical trials, safety, vaccine, Johnson & Johnson, Janssen
Johnson & Johnson Pauses COVID-19 Vaccine Trials
Amanda Heidt | Oct 13, 2020
The company voluntarily paused its studies, including one in Phase 3, after an unexplained illness in a patient.
A Challenge Trial for COVID-19 Would Not Be the First of Its Kind
Jef Akst | Oct 8, 2020
Although scientists debate the ethics of deliberately infecting volunteers with SARS-CoV-2, plenty of consenting participants have been exposed to all sorts of pathogens in prior trials.
Two COVID-19 Clinical Trials Seek to Enroll Pregnant Women
Jef Akst | Jul 20, 2020
Upon seeing pregnant women sick with COVID-19 at a University of Pennsylvania hospital, researchers there wrote trial protocols for blood transfusions to treat the disease that include expecting mothers.
Early Results Are Positive for Experimental CRISPR Therapies
Jef Akst | Nov 19, 2019
Two clinical trial participants—one with β-thalassemia and one with sickle cell disease—appeared to benefit from the gene-editing treatments with minimal side effects, according to the companies.
Data Sharing in Action: When Drug Companies Open Their Trial Vaults
Abby Olena | Dec 3, 2018
YODA, a program facilitated by Yale University researchers, has successfully distributed clinical trial records from Johnson & Johnson and Medtronic to external researchers since 2013.
Clinical Trial Database Launches
Bob Grant | Oct 12, 2016
OpenTrials.net seeks to increase transparency and make clinical research more accessible to the public.
Opinion: Why Most TBI Studies Fail
Donald Stein | Feb 24, 2016
Thoughts on how to redesign clinical trials for traumatic brain injury
Why an HIV Vax Only Works for Some
Anna Azvolinsky | Jul 15, 2015
Scientists identify a human leukocyte antigen gene linked to immune protection from HIV following vaccination.
Clinical Matchmaker
Kate Yandell | Jun 1, 2015
Enrolling the right patient population could be key to a successful clinical trial.