A headshot of Matthew Gage
Evolutionary Ecologist Matthew Gage Dies at 55
The University of East Anglia researcher was best known for his contributions to the study of sexual selection, particularly post-copulatory sperm competition.
ABOVE: University of East Anglia
Evolutionary Ecologist Matthew Gage Dies at 55
Evolutionary Ecologist Matthew Gage Dies at 55

The University of East Anglia researcher was best known for his contributions to the study of sexual selection, particularly post-copulatory sperm competition.

The University of East Anglia researcher was best known for his contributions to the study of sexual selection, particularly post-copulatory sperm competition.

ABOVE: University of East Anglia

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Last Chance to Enter Our Annual Top 10 Innovations Contest
The Scientist Staff | Aug 18, 2020
The deadline is this Friday to submit your new product and have a chance at being selected for a coveted spot in The Scientist’s 2020 competition.
Extended Until August 19: Enter Our Top 10 Innovations Contest Today
The Scientist Staff | Aug 12, 2019
Submit your new product by the end of the day Monday to have a chance at being selected for a coveted spot in The Scientist's 2019 competition.
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Our Top 10 Innovations Competition Is Accepting Submissions
The Scientist Staff | Apr 28, 2019
Enter your new product to have a chance at being selected for a coveted spot in The Scientist’s 2019 contest.
chimpanzee testes
Why Chimpanzees Have Big Testes, and Mandrills Have Small Ones
Katarina Zimmer | Apr 16, 2019
For primates, males’ fancier ornaments are linked with smaller testes, according to a new comparative study.
Image of the Day: Fight Club
Carolyn Wilke | Jan 11, 2019
South American hummingbird males were caught on camera poking and pinching each other with bills adapted for fighting.
Image of the Day: Weevil Eye
Kerry Grens | Oct 17, 2018
The Nikon photomicrography competition winners of 2018 include striking close-ups of a compound eye, a fern, and an insect’s bubble house.
Time Is Running Out to Enter Our Top 10 Innovations Contest
The Scientist Staff | May 13, 2018
There is less than one week left to submit your product for a coveted spot in The Scientist’s 2018 competition.
Last Chance to Enter the Fray
The Scientist Staff | Jun 11, 2017
You only have a couple of days left to submit a product in The Scientist's Top 10 Innovation competition. Your product can't win if it doesn't get in!
Oklahoma De-funds Science Fair
Kerry Grens | Apr 12, 2017
Students launch a fundraising campaign to rescue the event, which was a casualty of budget cuts to the state’s education department. 
The History of Optogenetics Revised
Kerry Grens | Sep 1, 2016
Credit for the neuroscience technique has largely overlooked the researcher who first demonstrated the method.
Behavior Brief
Jenny Rood | Feb 6, 2015
A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research
A New Breed
Kerry Grens | Dec 1, 2014
Genomics and advanced reproductive technologies have turned cattle breeding into a whole new animal.
Clone Wars
Kerry Grens | Nov 30, 2014
Watch scenes from the 2013 World Dairy Expo, where KHW Regiment Apple-Red-ET won the reserve championship while her clone took home the grand championship.
Science Speak
Rina Shaikh-Lesko | Aug 1, 2014
Contests that challenge young scientists to explain their research without jargon are turning science communication into a competitive sport.
Scientific Elevator Pitches
Rina Shaikh-Lesko | Jul 31, 2014
A number of competitions around the world are challenging young scientists to describe their research in mere minutes.
Doodoo Rendezvous
Bob Grant | Jun 30, 2014
Watch flightless dung beetles (Circellium bacchus), sneaky copulators and crap connoisseurs, do their thing in South Africa.
£10 Million Prize to Focus on Antibiotic Resistance
Bob Grant | Jun 27, 2014
The British public votes to make creating a better test for bacterial infections the goal of the UK government’s Longitude Prize.
Spiders Try to Ensure Paternity
Bob Grant | Jun 11, 2014
Male dwarf spiders deploy sperm-blocking plugs to thwart the reproductive chances of their mate’s subsequent suitors.
Sharing the Wealth
Jef Akst | May 1, 2014
From research results to electronic health records, biomedical data are becoming increasingly accessible. How can scientists best capitalize on the information deluge?