A gavel sits on top of a stack of clipboards and papers on an open laptop with the screen showing graphs
Munich Court Ruling Sides with Elsevier, ACS over ResearchGate
The academic networking service ResearchGate was infringing on copyrights held by scientific publishers when it hosted manuscripts from their journals, the European court said, but the website will not have to pay damages.
ABOVE: © ISTOCK.COM, JUSTSTOCK
Munich Court Ruling Sides with Elsevier, ACS over ResearchGate
Munich Court Ruling Sides with Elsevier, ACS over ResearchGate

The academic networking service ResearchGate was infringing on copyrights held by scientific publishers when it hosted manuscripts from their journals, the European court said, but the website will not have to pay damages.

The academic networking service ResearchGate was infringing on copyrights held by scientific publishers when it hosted manuscripts from their journals, the European court said, but the website will not have to pay damages.

ABOVE: © ISTOCK.COM, JUSTSTOCK

court

photo of building with flag of Mexico
Scientists Face a Third Round of Charges by Mexican Government
Chloe Tenn | Oct 15, 2021
Nearly three dozen of Mexico’s leading researchers are being accused of money laundering, embezzlement, and organized crime, a move other academics say is politically motivated.
U Missouri Grad Students Can Unionize: State Supreme Court
Emily Makowski | Nov 8, 2019
After a series of appeals from the university, Missouri courts have ruled for the third time that students have collective bargaining rights.
Who Owns the ‘Dueling Dinos’? Montana Supreme Court To Decide
Ashley P. Taylor | Jul 11, 2019
The answer has broad implications for paleontology research—and maybe for museum collections, too.
Recipients of Experimental Herpes Vaccine File Lawsuit
Catherine Offord | Mar 14, 2018
The suit claims that Rational Vaccines, the company of recently deceased researcher William Halford, violated US and international laws when it carried out the procedure.
UK Judges Receive Primers on Forensic Science
Catherine Offord | Mar 1, 2018
Scientists in the U.K., in collaboration with members of the judiciary, have launched the first in a series of explanatory documents designed to help integrate science into the courtroom.
Point of Order
The Scientist Staff | Feb 28, 2018
Watch Niamh Nic Daéid’s TedX talk about forensic evidence in the courtroom.
Sci-Hub Loses Domains and Access to Some Web Services
Diana Kwon | Feb 19, 2018
A few months after the American Chemical Society won its lawsuit against the pirate site, the game of virtual whack-a-mole continues.
New Developments in CRISPR Patent Case
Jef Akst | Dec 12, 2016
Documents suggest Feng Zhang started working on CRISPR before Jennifer Doudna’s group published; researchers call for CRISPR technology to be shared openly
PubPeer Wins Appeal on Anonymous Comments
Joshua A. Krisch, Bob Grant | Dec 7, 2016
The Michigan Court of Appeals rules that anonymous commenters on the post-publication peer review website are protected under the First Amendment.
Full Sarkar Investigation Report Won’t Enter Appeals Court Case
Bob Grant | Dec 1, 2016
Court of Appeals denies a motion filed by ACLU lawyers to enter the full Wayne State University investigation of pathologist Fazlul Sarkar into the official case record.
PubPeer Lawyers Ask to Enter Misconduct Report into the Court Record
Bob Grant | Nov 17, 2016
Lawyers for PubPeer have obtained and posted the full investigation report from Wayne State University, which lists more than 140 misconduct allegations against pathologist Fazlul Sarkar.
PubPeer Requests that Court Consider Misconduct Investigation
Bob Grant | Oct 20, 2016
ACLU lawyers representing the post-publication peer review site have filed a motion to admit the existence of a university investigation that found pathologist Fazlul Sarkar guilty of misconduct.
Misconduct Finding Could Impact PubPeer Litigation
Bob Grant | Oct 19, 2016
Wayne State University’s conclusion that pathologist Fazlul Sarkar committed research misconduct could affect the ongoing legal proceedings related to anonymous critics of his work.
Can Talc Cause Cancer?
Kerry Grens | Mar 1, 2016
A jury recently awarded $72 million in a talcum-powder–ovarian cancer case, but the data linking the hygiene product to disease risk are inconclusive.
PubPeer’s Appeal for Anonymity Continues
Kerry Grens | Jan 21, 2016
The site’s lawyers, along with renowned scientists, filed briefs to an appeals court asking to protect a commenter’s identification.
Embattled Chimps Relocate
Kerry Grens | Jan 9, 2016
After losing out on “personhood” in a legal battle, two chimpanzees that were held at a university in New York return to a research center in Louisiana.
Opinion: Brain Scans in the Courtroom
Andreas Kuersten | Nov 23, 2015
Advances in neuroimaging have improved our understanding of the brain, but the resulting data do little to help judges and juries determine criminal culpability.
Bad Blood Between California Universities
Bob Grant | Jul 8, 2015
The University of California, San Diego, is suing the University of Southern California and a former employee over alleged data theft, among other charges of academic animosity.
Virus Denier Ordered to Pay Up
Bob Grant | Mar 16, 2015
A biologist who offered €100,000 to anyone who could prove that measles is a virus must pony up, a German court says.