Genetic Risks for Depression Differ Between Ancestral Groups
Genetic Risks for Depression Differ Between Ancestral Groups
A large genome-wide association study in East Asians uncovers novel genetic links to depression, calling attention to the consequences of underrepresentation of non-European groups in genetic research data.
Genetic Risks for Depression Differ Between Ancestral Groups
Genetic Risks for Depression Differ Between Ancestral Groups

A large genome-wide association study in East Asians uncovers novel genetic links to depression, calling attention to the consequences of underrepresentation of non-European groups in genetic research data.

A large genome-wide association study in East Asians uncovers novel genetic links to depression, calling attention to the consequences of underrepresentation of non-European groups in genetic research data.

diversity
Longer Days Led to Oxygen Buildup on Early Earth: Study
Longer Days Led to Oxygen Buildup on Early Earth: Study
Amanda Heidt | Aug 3, 2021
Researchers propose that some of the planet’s earliest photosynthesizers benefited from a slowing of the Earth’s rotation that allowed them to produce a surplus of oxygen and paved the way for more complex life.  
Survey Finds Lack of Diversity Among Journal Editors
Survey Finds Lack of Diversity Among Journal Editors
Jef Akst | Jun 14, 2021
Collecting data on the various races, sexual orientations, and gender identities of editors at 25 scientific and medical journals, researchers document the underrepresentation of minority groups.
How STEM Can Be More Inclusive of Scientists with Disabilities
How STEM Can Be More Inclusive of Scientists with Disabilities
Amanda Heidt | Jun 7, 2021
The culture of academia can make disabled scientists wary of disclosing their conditions or needs. Molecular biologist Justin Yerbury suggests how the system might become more inclusive. 
A New Human Reference Genome Represents the Most Common Sequences
A New Human Reference Genome Represents the Most Common Sequences
Ashleen Knutsen | Dec 23, 2020
Researchers create a “consensus genome” that halves the number of errors when mapping transcripts, although they say the current standard is still a good tool.
The Biggest Science News of 2020
The Biggest Science News of 2020
Kerry Grens | Dec 23, 2020
Neanderthal DNA surprises in modern humans, the first blood test for Alzheimer’s, a discovery of new human salivary glands, and, oh yeah, a pandemic
Initiative Addresses Racial Disparities in Neuroscience
Initiative Addresses Racial Disparities in Neuroscience
Amanda Heidt | Dec 1, 2020
The African Ancestry Neuroscience Research Initiative plans to boost inclusion in genomic studies and support a more diverse generation of neuroscientists.
Black in X Addresses Long-Standing Inequity in STEM
Black in X Addresses Long-Standing Inequity in STEM
Lisa Winter | Nov 16, 2020
In a year of racial tumult, Black scientists are uniting for visibility and action. 
New Genome Sequences Reveal Undescribed African Migration
New Genome Sequences Reveal Undescribed African Migration
Max Kozlov | Oct 29, 2020
An analysis of the genomes of people from 50 ethnolinguistic groups in Africa spots 62 genes under positive selection and 3 million more genetic variants than previously documented.
New Map Charts Genetic Expression Across Tissue Types, Sexes
New Map Charts Genetic Expression Across Tissue Types, Sexes
Ashley Yeager | Sep 10, 2020
A decade-long effort to probe gene regulation reveals differences between males and females, points to essential regulatory elements, and offers insight into past work on telomeres.
Open Letter
An Open Letter: Scientists and Racial Justice
An Open Letter: Scientists and Racial Justice
Joseph Graves, Erich D. Jarvis | Jun 19, 2020
What we can and must do to make science more equitable.
China Catches Up with the US in Science and Tech
China Catches Up with the US in Science and Tech
Catherine Offord | Jan 17, 2020
A new report from the National Science Board identifies changes in the US’s global R&D investment and output, as well as in the country’s science and engineering workforce in recent years.
Do English-Only Policies Foster or Damage Inclusivity in Science?
Do English-Only Policies Foster or Damage Inclusivity in Science?
Shawna Williams | Dec 1, 2019
Speaking a common language is key to a well-integrated team, but guidance is sparse on what—if anything—principal investigators should do about it.
Sleep Study in Antarctica Explores Role of Cultural Differences
Sleep Study in Antarctica Explores Role of Cultural Differences
Alejandra Manjarrez | Dec 1, 2019
Habits such as napping might influence how humans cope with extreme environments, such as those at a polar research facility in winter.
Study of Ugandan Genomes Yields Novel Variants, Health Links
Study of Ugandan Genomes Yields Novel Variants, Health Links
Shawna Williams | Oct 31, 2019
The authors say their results demonstrate the global benefits of studying African genetics.
Sequences of African Genomes Highlights Long-Overlooked Diversity
Sequences of African Genomes Highlights Long-Overlooked Diversity
Jef Akst | Oct 18, 2019
An analysis of more than 400 human genomes from residents of 13 African countries presented at this week’s annual meeting of the American Society of Human Genetics greatly expands our species’ cataloged genetic diversity.
Biased Evaluation Committees Promote Fewer Women
Biased Evaluation Committees Promote Fewer Women
Nicoletta Lanese | Aug 26, 2019
If members don’t explicitly believe gender discrimination exists, they allow implicit stereotypes to sway their decision-making, according to a new analysis of real-world hiring decisions.
Moving Towards Individualized Medicine For All
Moving Towards Individualized Medicine For All
Bob Grant | Jul 15, 2019
How we talk about the coming revolution in clinical care matters as much as the need to involve all types of people in the process.
Faculty Value Diversity, Though Time and Funding Are Barriers
Faculty Value Diversity, Though Time and Funding Are Barriers
Chia-Yi Hou | Jun 3, 2019
A study finds professors from underrepresented groups more actively engage in diversity and inclusion activities.
Otto Cordero Studies Bacteria in the Wild
Otto Cordero Studies Bacteria in the Wild
Catherine Offord | Jun 1, 2019
The MIT associate professor wants to understand microbial communities in their ecological context.