ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
Image of three chromosomes trees with the highlighted section displaying telomeres shortening over time as falling leaves.
Chromosome Ends in Double Jeopardy
Researchers have finally uncovered the other half of the end-replication problem at the lagging strand.
Chromosome Ends in Double Jeopardy
Chromosome Ends in Double Jeopardy

Researchers have finally uncovered the other half of the end-replication problem at the lagging strand.

Researchers have finally uncovered the other half of the end-replication problem at the lagging strand.

DNA replication

Crystalline ball-and-stick model representation of a molecular structure.
Prioritizing PARylation in DNA Damage and Repair
The Scientist Staff | Apr 1, 2024 | 2 min read
Measuring cellular poly ADP-ribosylation can unlock new anticancer strategies and approaches.
A view of the nucleus of a cell with DNA in blue, RNA in pink, and associated proteins in yellow and purple
DNA Methylation Influences Replication and Genome Organization
Abby Olena, PhD | Sep 22, 2021 | 3 min read
A study links the loss of DNA methylation across the genome—as is common in cancer—to the disruption of the 3-D compartments that organize the genome and to the timing of DNA replication.
DNA Damage Linked to Brain Overgrowth in Autism
Abby Olena, PhD | Feb 5, 2020 | 4 min read
Cell lines from individuals with macrocephalic autism spectrum disorder have an increased number of double-strand breaks in the DNA of long neural genes.
Cancer Researcher, Former AACR President Dies
Kerry Grens | Nov 13, 2017 | 2 min read
Donald Coffey, a longtime professor at Johns Hopkins University, discovered the nuclear matrix within cells and its role in DNA replication.
The Role of DNA Base Modifications
Skirmantas Kriaucionis | Sep 1, 2017 | 10+ min read
Researchers are just beginning to scratch the surface of how several newly recognized epigenetic changes function in the genome.
Telomere Basics
Rodrigo Calado and Neal Young | May 1, 2012 | 1 min read
Telomeres are repetitive, noncoding sequences that cap the ends of linear chromosomes. They consist of hexameric nucleotide sequences (TTAGGG in humans) repeated hundreds to thousands of times. 
ADVERTISEMENT