A headshot of Matthew Gage
Evolutionary Ecologist Matthew Gage Dies at 55
The University of East Anglia researcher was best known for his contributions to the study of sexual selection, particularly post-copulatory sperm competition.
Evolutionary Ecologist Matthew Gage Dies at 55
Evolutionary Ecologist Matthew Gage Dies at 55

The University of East Anglia researcher was best known for his contributions to the study of sexual selection, particularly post-copulatory sperm competition.

The University of East Anglia researcher was best known for his contributions to the study of sexual selection, particularly post-copulatory sperm competition.

ABOVE: University of East Anglia
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