Male Flies’ Y Chromosome May Contribute to Earlier Deaths
Male Flies’ Y Chromosome May Contribute to Earlier Deaths
As male Drosophila grow old, selfish genetic elements that are abundant on the Y chromosome become more active, which appears to reduce longevity.
Male Flies’ Y Chromosome May Contribute to Earlier Deaths
Male Flies’ Y Chromosome May Contribute to Earlier Deaths

As male Drosophila grow old, selfish genetic elements that are abundant on the Y chromosome become more active, which appears to reduce longevity.

As male Drosophila grow old, selfish genetic elements that are abundant on the Y chromosome become more active, which appears to reduce longevity.

Heterochromatin
Image of the Day: It’s Alive
Image of the Day: It’s Alive
The Scientist Staff | Sep 13, 2017
New microscopy techniques reveal that heterochromatin—the condensed, seemingly dormant portions of DNA—is not as dense as scientists once thought.
Meiosis Maven
Meiosis Maven
Anna Azvolinsky | Feb 1, 2014
Fueled by her love of visual data and addicted to chromosomes, Abby Dernburg continues to study how homologous chromosomes find each other during gamete formation.