A germinal center inside a lymph node
Slow Vaccine Delivery May Maximize Immune Response
A vaccine strategy involving formulation changes, an initial escalating dose, and a longer wait for booster immunization results in more effective antibody production against HIV in rhesus monkeys, a study finds.
Slow Vaccine Delivery May Maximize Immune Response
Slow Vaccine Delivery May Maximize Immune Response

A vaccine strategy involving formulation changes, an initial escalating dose, and a longer wait for booster immunization results in more effective antibody production against HIV in rhesus monkeys, a study finds.

A vaccine strategy involving formulation changes, an initial escalating dose, and a longer wait for booster immunization results in more effective antibody production against HIV in rhesus monkeys, a study finds.

HIV vaccine
COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2, coronavirus, pandemic, vaccine, vaccine trials, combination, mix and match, immunity, antibodies, T cells, Pfizer, Moderna, AstraZeneca, clinical trials
COVID-19 Vaccine Combos Aim to Boost Immunity
Asher Jones | Mar 9, 2021
Mix-and-match shots could simplify vaccine rollout and stimulate more-robust immune responses. Ongoing clinical trials will soon give answers.
“Public” T-Cell Receptors From Resistant People Fend Off HIV
Shawna Williams | Jun 8, 2018
The receptors, found in so-called elite controllers who don’t need medications to keep the virus in check, suggest a new path toward immunotherapy.
Unique Antibodies Open Path Toward New HIV Vaccines
Amanda B. Keener | Jan 27, 2017
A family of broadly neutralizing antibodies from a chronically infected donor provides a schematic for designing vaccines and treatments that target multiple strains of the virus.
Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies in HIV Patients
Jef Akst | Sep 28, 2016
Researchers identify aspects of the patient, the virus, and the infection itself that influence whether a person with HIV will produce broadly neutralizing antibodies.
Antibodies Prevent HIV Infection in Monkeys
Jef Akst | Apr 29, 2016
Infusing anti-HIV antibodies provides macaques with protection against infection for up to six months, according to a study.
Why an HIV Vax Only Works for Some
Anna Azvolinsky | Jul 15, 2015
Scientists identify a human leukocyte antigen gene linked to immune protection from HIV following vaccination.
Contributors
Jenny Rood | May 1, 2015
Meet some of the people featured in the May 2015 issue of The Scientist.
Hiding in the Haystack
Mary Beth Aberlin | May 1, 2015
Encouraging developments in HIV research
HIV Structural Studies Undermine Prior Work
Bob Grant | Nov 4, 2013
New research on the structure of the surface protein the virus uses to infiltrate human cells clashes with an earlier paper’s findings, causing some scientists to call for a retraction.
Week in Review: April 1-5
Jef Akst | Apr 5, 2013
Living fossils not so fossilized; Canadian gov’t threatens scientists’ freedom to speak and publish; gene therapy for sensory disorders; an unusual theory of cancer; clues for an HIV vaccine
Roadmap to an HIV Vaccine
Sabrina Richards | Apr 3, 2013
Researchers track the evolution of HIV in a single patient to understand what drives the production of broadly neutralizing antibodies.
HIV Evolves Vulnerability
Sabrina Richards | Oct 21, 2012
In mutating to evade immune detection, HIV becomes susceptible to detection by different antibodies, suggesting new strategies for vaccination.