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A germinal center inside a lymph node
Slow Vaccine Delivery May Maximize Immune Response
A vaccine strategy involving formulation changes, an initial escalating dose, and a longer wait for booster immunization results in more-effective antibody production against HIV in rhesus monkeys, a study finds.
Slow Vaccine Delivery May Maximize Immune Response
Slow Vaccine Delivery May Maximize Immune Response

A vaccine strategy involving formulation changes, an initial escalating dose, and a longer wait for booster immunization results in more-effective antibody production against HIV in rhesus monkeys, a study finds.

A vaccine strategy involving formulation changes, an initial escalating dose, and a longer wait for booster immunization results in more-effective antibody production against HIV in rhesus monkeys, a study finds.

HIV vaccine
COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2, coronavirus, pandemic, vaccine, vaccine trials, combination, mix and match, immunity, antibodies, T cells, Pfizer, Moderna, AstraZeneca, clinical trials
COVID-19 Vaccine Combos Aim to Boost Immunity
Asher Jones | Mar 9, 2021 | 6 min read
Mix-and-match shots could simplify vaccine rollout and stimulate more-robust immune responses. Ongoing clinical trials will soon give answers.
“Public” T-Cell Receptors From Resistant People Fend Off HIV
Shawna Williams | Jun 8, 2018 | 4 min read
The receptors, found in so-called elite controllers who don’t need medications to keep the virus in check, suggest a new path toward immunotherapy.
Unique Antibodies Open Path Toward New HIV Vaccines
Amanda B. Keener | Jan 27, 2017 | 3 min read
A family of broadly neutralizing antibodies from a chronically infected donor provides a schematic for designing vaccines and treatments that target multiple strains of the virus.
Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies in HIV Patients
Jef Akst | Sep 28, 2016 | 2 min read
Researchers identify aspects of the patient, the virus, and the infection itself that influence whether a person with HIV will produce broadly neutralizing antibodies.
Antibodies Prevent HIV Infection in Monkeys
Jef Akst | Apr 29, 2016 | 2 min read
Infusing anti-HIV antibodies provides macaques with protection against infection for up to six months, according to a study.
Why an HIV Vax Only Works for Some
Anna Azvolinsky | Jul 15, 2015 | 3 min read
Scientists identify a human leukocyte antigen gene linked to immune protection from HIV following vaccination.
Contributors
Jenny Rood | May 1, 2015 | 3 min read
Meet some of the people featured in the May 2015 issue of The Scientist.
Hiding in the Haystack
Mary Beth Aberlin | May 1, 2015 | 3 min read
Encouraging developments in HIV research
HIV Structural Studies Undermine Prior Work
Bob Grant | Nov 4, 2013 | 2 min read
New research on the structure of the surface protein the virus uses to infiltrate human cells clashes with an earlier paper’s findings, causing some scientists to call for a retraction.
Week in Review: April 1-5
Jef Akst | Apr 5, 2013 | 3 min read
Living fossils not so fossilized; Canadian gov’t threatens scientists’ freedom to speak and publish; gene therapy for sensory disorders; an unusual theory of cancer; clues for an HIV vaccine
Roadmap to an HIV Vaccine
Sabrina Richards | Apr 3, 2013 | 3 min read
Researchers track the evolution of HIV in a single patient to understand what drives the production of broadly neutralizing antibodies.
HIV Evolves Vulnerability
Sabrina Richards | Oct 21, 2012 | 3 min read
In mutating to evade immune detection, HIV becomes susceptible to detection by different antibodies, suggesting new strategies for vaccination.
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