Lower half of a skeleton with an apparently amputated left leg
31,000-Year-Old Skeleton Reveals Oldest Known Surgery
A Stone Age individual’s left leg healed after being amputated just above the foot, allowing them to survive for six to nine years after the procedure was performed, researchers say.
31,000-Year-Old Skeleton Reveals Oldest Known Surgery
31,000-Year-Old Skeleton Reveals Oldest Known Surgery

A Stone Age individual’s left leg healed after being amputated just above the foot, allowing them to survive for six to nine years after the procedure was performed, researchers say.

A Stone Age individual’s left leg healed after being amputated just above the foot, allowing them to survive for six to nine years after the procedure was performed, researchers say.

human
Woman and baby chimpanzee face to face, as if they were talking to each other
Could a Less Complex Larynx Have Enabled Speech in Humans?
Alejandra Manjarrez | Aug 11, 2022
A paper argues that the evolutionary loss of a thin vocal membrane in the larynx may have facilitated oral communication.  
A section of a mouse distal colon showing luminal contents with bacteria in magenta, the mucus lining (green) and the epithelial cell barrier of the gut (blue, right).
Mapping the Neighborhoods of the Gut Microbiome
Abby Olena | Jul 1, 2022
Researchers are going beyond fecal samples to understand how the patterns of commensal microbes in the gastrointestinal tract influence development and health.
Composite image of earliest humans and wooly mammoths
New Evidence Complicates the Story of the Peopling of the Americas
Emma Yasinski | May 2, 2022
New techniques have shown that people reached the New World far earlier than the long-standing estimate of 13,000 years ago, but scientists still debate exactly when humans arrived on the continent—and how.
Illustrated map showing where evidence was found of the earliest humans
Infographic: Mixed Evidence on Human Occupation of the Americas
Emma Yasinski | May 2, 2022
Diverse lines of evidence point to humans’ presence in the New World long before the dawn of Clovis culture. But rewriting this chapter of human history raises many questions about how these early people came to inhabit these continents.
An illustration shows circular red blood cells running into a yellow cholesterol blockage in a transverse section of an artery on a blue and purple background
Genetic Variant Discovered in Amish Protects from Heart Disease
Abby Olena | Dec 2, 2021
Researchers link a missense mutation in the B4GALT1 gene to lower levels of LDL cholesterol and the blood clotting factor fibrinogen.
Deer at grass field with autumn trees at the background stock photo
Researchers Detect Coronavirus in Iowa Deer
Chloe Tenn | Nov 3, 2021
Multiple white tailed deer tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 likely transmitted from humans, a study finds, indicating the species could act as a reservoir for the virus.
Red blood cells are pictured in grayscale on a gray background
Red Blood Cells Activate Innate Immune System
Abby Olena | Oct 20, 2021
Researchers link the ability of the cells to bind and present DNA from pathogens and cell death to anemia, which is common in COVID-19, and immune activation.
silhouette of a chimpanzee swinging against a blue sky
Alu Leap May Explain Why Apes Don’t Have Tails
Annie Melchor | Sep 23, 2021
A transposable element that jumped into the TBXT gene, which is linked to tail morphology, appears to be to blame for our missing appendage.
A grayscale electron micrograph shows hundreds of sperm cells stuck together in the foreground
Antibodies Stop Sperm in Their Tracks
Abby Olena | Aug 11, 2021
Engineered antibodies trap and immobilize human sperm in the reproductive tract of female sheep, paving the way for possible use as a nonhormonal contraceptive in people.
Giving Sweat the Respect It Deserves
Sarah Everts | Jul 13, 2021
Not only is the humble fluid a boon for keeping humans cool, it also contains a wealth of biological information.
A vial containing a red blood sample is balanced on its end on a table or desk by someone wearing a blue medical glove on their right hand
New Evidence Shows COVID-19 Was in US Weeks Before Thought
Abby Olena | Jun 17, 2021
Some of the blood specimens collected in the United States for the NIH’s All of Us research program starting on January 2, 2020, have antibodies against SARS-CoV-2.
A scanning electron micrograph of a fetal gut, pseudocolored in yellow and blue
Microbes in Human Fetuses Spur Immune Development
Abby Olena | Jun 3, 2021
Researchers identify live bacteria in fetal guts, skin, lungs, and placentas that activate memory T cells, indicating that early exposure to microbes could help educate the developing immune system.
A pregnant figure is shaded in blue and outlined in blue, pink, and purple
Blood Biomarkers Predict the Onset of Labor: Study
Abby Olena | May 6, 2021
Researchers integrated information from 45 protein, metabolite, and immune data points to identify a window two to four weeks before a pregnant person will go into labor.
an illustration of multiple animals, including a parrot, flamingo, zebra, and leopard
Book Excerpt From How to Be Animal
Melanie Challenger | Apr 1, 2021
In Chapter 1, “The Indelible Stamp,” author Melanie Challenger addresses the idea of human exceptionalism.
Opinion: Facing Assumptions About the Duality of Human and Animal
Melanie Challenger | Apr 1, 2021
Since Darwin published his landmark work on natural selection, we’ve understood that we’re animals. But that doesn’t mean we really believe it.
Questions Raised About How an Ancient Hominin Moved
Abby Olena | Feb 24, 2021
A new analysis of the hand of the 4.4-million-year-old partial skeleton of Ardipithecus ramidus indicates that the human ancestor may have climbed and swung through trees like chimpanzees do.
Organoids Repair Bile Ducts
Abby Olena | Feb 18, 2021
Researchers determined that when introduced into damaged mouse or donated human livers, these lab-grown tissues could integrate into bile ducts and function normally.
Pregnant COVID-19 Patients
The Scientist Staff | Jan 11, 2021
See a news report on a study of expectant mothers with SARS-CoV-2 infections.
Human Fetuses Can Contract SARS-CoV-2, but It’s Rare
Ashley Yeager | Jan 1, 2021
Compared with Zika and cytomegalovirus, the virus that causes COVID-19 appears to have a harder time penetrating the placenta and moving to a woman’s unborn baby.