ADVERTISEMENT
three black mice lined up next to each other. the one on the left, fed a low-fat diet, has one small bald patch, the middle mouse, fed fish oil, has a large bald spot across its shoulders and back, and the right mouse, fed cocoa butter, has no baldness.
Fish Oil in Diet Can Cause Hair Loss in Mice, Study Finds
The oil’s omega-3 fatty acids accumulate in the mice’s skin, triggering an immune response that causes hair loss.
Fish Oil in Diet Can Cause Hair Loss in Mice, Study Finds
Fish Oil in Diet Can Cause Hair Loss in Mice, Study Finds

The oil’s omega-3 fatty acids accumulate in the mice’s skin, triggering an immune response that causes hair loss.

The oil’s omega-3 fatty acids accumulate in the mice’s skin, triggering an immune response that causes hair loss.

immune response
a small black mouse sits next to an obese black mouse on a white background
Obesity Protects Against Genital Herpes in Mice, Study Finds
Katherine Irving | Nov 11, 2022 | 3 min read
A high-fat diet induced changes to the animals’ vaginal microbiomes that boosted survival after exposure to the virus.
an immune cell in blood
Why Viral Infections Are More Severe in People with Down Syndrome
Andy Carstens | Oct 14, 2022 | 6 min read
In people with the genetic condition, inflammation can cause a mild infection to snowball out of control, a study finds.
Learn how researchers develop novel vaccines with new technologies 
The Vaccine Journey: From Bench to Needle
Bio-Rad | 1 min read
Researchers build better vaccines thanks to innovative technology.
3D rendered images of three T cell
T Cells Ward Off Aging with Help from Their Friends
Natalia Mesa, PhD | Sep 16, 2022 | 5 min read
Immune cells deliver packages of telomeres to T cells, helping them retain their virus-fighting function over time, research suggests.
Bright purple and orange lactobacillus bacteria.
How a Specific Gut Bacterium May Cause Type 1 Diabetes
Dan Robitzski | Aug 25, 2022 | 5 min read
A bacterium that produces an insulin-like peptide can give mice type 1 diabetes, and infection with the microbe seems to predict the onset of the disease in humans, a study finds.
Leveraging the Microbiome to Break Down Tumor Resistance
Leveraging the Microbiome to Break Down Tumor Resistance
The Scientist’s Creative Services Team and PerkinElmer | 1 min read
Mat Robinson and Mark Tangney discuss how enhancing the efficacy of immune checkpoint inhibitors improves patient outcomes.
Artist’s rendition of light blue monkeypox viruses in front of a black background.
FDA To Stretch Monkeypox Vaccine Supply via Intradermal Injection
Shafaq Zia | Aug 12, 2022 | 4 min read
The newly authorized intradermal vaccination only requires one-fifth of the usual vaccine dose. This will help stretch out the limited vaccine supply, experts say, but only if healthcare personnel receive sufficient training.
Man in lab coat looking at the camera and smiling
Can Taking a Test Now Tell You if You’ve Already Had COVID-19?
Natalia Mesa, PhD | Aug 8, 2022 | 4 min read
The Scientist asks Brigham and Women’s Hospital infectious disease specialist Lindsey Baden about testing for prior infections.
Learn About Sero-Surveillance During the COVID-19 Pandemic
Using Sero-Surveillance to Combat the COVID-19 Pandemic
The Scientist’s Creative Services Team and Bio-Rad Laboratories | 1 min read
Immunoassays for detecting, tracking, and testing SARS-CoV-2 antibody responses
Illustration showing rod-shaped Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria in the lungs of a person with tuberculosis
Delayed T cell Response Allows Tuberculosis to Gain Foothold in Monkeys
Anna Napolitano | Jun 1, 2022 | 5 min read
The results could help guide the design of new vaccines for the disease.
Microscopic image of nerves in the eye, a pathogen, and t cells
Science Snapshot: Eye Immunity
Lisa Winter | May 26, 2022 | 1 min read
Researchers find that tissue-resident memory T cells in the corneas of mice engender a lasting immune response.
Cytokine storm
The Next Generation of Immunoassays Support COVID-19 Research
The Scientist Creative Services Team in collaboration with Bio-Techne | 3 min read
An automated, microfluidic immunoassay system enables researchers to quickly and reliably measure cytokines in patient blood samples.
Metal shelves densely packed with preserved tissue specimens of various sizes, all suspended in glass containers.
Evolution of 1918 Flu Virus Traced from Century-Old Samples
Dan Robitzski | May 10, 2022 | 5 min read
The work reveals that the pandemic flu was likely the direct predecessor of the seasonal H1N1 flu that circulated for decades.
A two-pronged needle, a glass vial of smallpox vaccine, and a syringe sit on a blue surface.
Smallpox Vaccine Recruits Skin Bacteria to Fight Disease
Patience Asanga | Apr 26, 2022 | 3 min read
A mouse study points to a possible mechanism by which the smallpox vaccine helped eradicate the disease in the 1980s.
Beyond Acute Respiration: SARS-CoV-2's Effects on Long-Term Physiology
The Scientist’s Creative Services Team | 1 min read
John Connolly and Masataka Nishiga discuss the effects of SARS-CoV-2 on the neurological and cardiovascular systems.
A micrograph from the first US case of COVID-19, with SARS-CoV-2 virus particles in blue
SARS-CoV-2 Can Spread Via Cell-to-Cell Transmission
Catherine Offord | Apr 4, 2022 | 2 min read
The virus’s ability to slip directly from one cell to another may help it avoid some of the body’s immune responses.
mice on wheel and ground
Exercise-Associated Protein Boosts Brain Function in Mice
Chloe Tenn | Dec 9, 2021 | 5 min read
A study that transfused plasma from active to inactive mice suggests the protein clusterin enhances cognition.
First Responders: SARS-CoV-2 and the Immune System
The Scientist’s Creative Services Team | 1 min read
Angela Rasmussen and Ya-Chi Ho explore the positive and negative aspects of the host immune response to SARS-CoV-2 infection and discuss how this knowledge influences therapeutic benefits.
illustration of a coronavirus and antibodies
When the Immune Response Makes COVID-19 Worse
Alejandra Manjarrez, PhD | Sep 27, 2021 | 8 min read
If the immune system makes mistakes—reacting late or getting the target wrong—it can amplify the damage wrought by SARS-CoV-2.
ADVERTISEMENT