Metal shelves densely packed with preserved tissue specimens of various sizes, all suspended in glass containers.
Evolution of 1918 Flu Virus Traced from Century-Old Samples
The work reveals that the pandemic flu was likely the direct predecessor of the seasonal H1N1 flu that circulated for decades.
ABOVE: NAVENA WIDULIN, BERLIN
Evolution of 1918 Flu Virus Traced from Century-Old Samples
Evolution of 1918 Flu Virus Traced from Century-Old Samples

The work reveals that the pandemic flu was likely the direct predecessor of the seasonal H1N1 flu that circulated for decades.

The work reveals that the pandemic flu was likely the direct predecessor of the seasonal H1N1 flu that circulated for decades.

ABOVE: NAVENA WIDULIN, BERLIN

immune response

A two-pronged needle, a glass vial of smallpox vaccine, and a syringe sit on a blue surface.
Smallpox Vaccine Recruits Skin Bacteria to Fight Disease
Patience Asanga | Apr 26, 2022
A mouse study points to a possible mechanism by which the smallpox vaccine helped eradicate the disease in the 1980s.
A micrograph from the first US case of COVID-19, with SARS-CoV-2 virus particles in blue
SARS-CoV-2 Can Spread Via Cell-to-Cell Transmission
Catherine Offord | Apr 4, 2022
The virus’s ability to slip directly from one cell to another may help it avoid some of the body’s immune responses.
Learn About Sero-Surveillance During the COVID-19 Pandemic
Using Sero-Surveillance to Combat the COVID-19 Pandemic
The Scientist Creative Services Team, Bio-Rad Laboratories | Feb 7, 2022
Immunoassays for detecting, tracking, and testing SARS-CoV-2 antibody responses
mice on wheel and ground
Exercise-Associated Protein Boosts Brain Function in Mice
Chloe Tenn | Dec 9, 2021
A study that transfused plasma from active to inactive mice suggests the protein clusterin enhances cognition.
illustration of a coronavirus and antibodies
When the Immune Response Makes COVID-19 Worse
Alejandra Manjarrez | Sep 27, 2021
If the immune system makes mistakes—reacting late or getting the target wrong—it can amplify the damage wrought by SARS-CoV-2.
Cytokine storm
The Next Generation of Immunoassays Support COVID-19 Research
The Scientist Creative Services Team in collaboration with Bio-Techne | Dec 14, 2021
An automated, microfluidic immunoassay system enables researchers to quickly and reliably measure cytokines in patient blood samples.
Updated Mar 8
A healthcare worker holds up three syringes with clear medicine
To Booster or Not: Scientists and Regulators Debate
Jef Akst | Sep 16, 2021
President Biden’s planned rollout of additional COVID-19 vaccine doses is set to begin next week, but questions remain about who should get them.
Illustration of the BCG vaccine and resulting immune response
Infographic: TB Vaccines in the Pipeline Take Varied Approaches
Anthony King | Jul 1, 2021
More than a dozen vaccines for tuberculosis are currently being tested in clinical trials. Some use whole bacteria as BCG does, while others deliver protein subunits or genetic material carried by viral vectors.  
Beyond Acute Respiration: SARS-CoV-2's Effects on Long-Term Physiology
The Scientist Creative Services Team | Nov 11, 2020
John Connolly and Masataka Nishiga discuss the effects of SARS-CoV-2 on the neurological and cardiovascular systems.
False-colored micrograph of Mycobacterium tuberculosis
Tuberculosis: The Forgotten Pandemic
Anthony King | Jul 1, 2021
This month marks the 100-year anniversary of BCG, still the only approved vaccine against the lethal pathogen. But there are new vaccines for this wily foe on the horizon.
An illustration of several human heads wearing masks
Q&A: Human Challenge Studies of COVID-19 Underway in UK
Jef Akst | Jun 18, 2021
Researchers at Imperial College London and the University of Oxford are exposing healthy volunteers to SARS-CoV-2 for science.
First Responders: SARS-CoV-2 and the Immune System
The Scientist Creative Services Team | Oct 29, 2020
Angela Rasmussen and Ya-Chi Ho explore the positive and negative aspects of the host immune response to SARS-CoV-2 infection and discuss how this knowledge influences therapeutic benefits.
Transmission electron microscope image of Zika virus particles
T Cell–Boosting Zika Vaccine Protects Mice from the Virus
Ruth Williams | May 12, 2021
By avoiding the production of antibodies, something vaccines ordinarily induce, the immunization sidesteps the problem of antibody-dependent enhancement, which can amplify infection by a similar virus and is known to occur with dengue and Zika.
Antibody Spike Months After Ebola Infection Surprisingly Common
Catherine Offord | Jan 27, 2021
A study of people in Sierra Leone suggests that the virus can lie in hiding from the immune system before re-emerging later and sparking a new response—although researchers didn’t examine whether this could make people infectious again.
Rapid Characterization of the SARS-CoV-2 Immune Response Using the Simple Western Multi-Antigen Serology Assay
The Scientist Creative Services Team | Oct 21, 2020
The Simple Western automated western blotting platform accelerates characterization of the human IgG immune response to COVID-19.
Infographic: How Vaccines Train Innate Immunity
Shawna Williams | Nov 1, 2020
A recent study elucidates some of the changes that occur in the body after inoculation with a tuberculosis vaccine.
Steroid Drugs Are an Effective Treatment for Severe COVID-19: WHO
Catherine Offord | Sep 3, 2020
A meta-analysis of seven randomized controlled trials concludes that dexamethasone and other corticosteroids reduce 28-day mortality in seriously ill patients.
stroke, animal model, mouse model, blood, cytokine storm, immune system, immune response, MMP-9, neutrophil
Blood Replacement Rescues Mice from Stroke Damage
Amanda Heidt | Aug 31, 2020
When mice that had suffered a stroke were given blood from a healthy donor, they experienced less tissue and neurological damage.
Immune Biomarkers Tied to Severe COVID-19: Study
Ruth Williams | Aug 19, 2020
Increases in the levels of three cytokines are among the features linked to poor outcomes.